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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Longtime U.S. Congressman Greg Walden, Republican of Oregon, has just announced he will not seek re-election and will retire at the end of his term. Walden is the 21st Republican to have left or announced they will leave during the 116th Congress.

As nationwide support for the impeachment and removal of President Donald Trump grows, many Republicans appear to be realizing they likely will not win back the House in 2020 and do not want to conduct a re-election campaign.

In 2016 Walden was one of just seven House Republicans who actually changed their vote to defeat a measure to protect LGBTQ people, resulting in its defeat. The bill had actually passed but Republicans, under the leadership of Speaker Paul Ryan, left the clock open to allow members to change their votes.

Walden, a hard core conservative, is the Ranking Member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee. An 11-term lawmakers, he was first elected to Congress in 1998. He is 62 years old.

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Jeff Danziger lives in New York City. He is represented by CWS Syndicate and the Washington Post Writers Group. He is the recipient of the Herblock Prize and the Thomas Nast (Landau) Prize. He served in the US Army in Vietnam and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Air Medal. He has published eleven books of cartoons and one novel. Visit him at DanzigerCartoons.

The late Sen. John McCain

I don't know Kyrsten Sinema, but I did know John McCain. Not at all intimately, to be sure, but just enough to say -- despite her pretensions and the fantasies of her flacks that she is the reincarnation of the war hero in a purple wig -- that Kyrsten Sinema is no John McCain.

Lately Sinema has advertised herself as a "maverick," by which she means that she flouts the positions and policies of her party's leadership, and is supposed to pair her with McCain, who sometimes strayed from the Republican party line. Her most notorious attempt at imitation occurred last year with a gesture on the Senate floor marking her vote against a minimum wage increase. Her coy mimicry of the admired war hero was synthetic, leaving an unpleasant odor in its wake. When McCain delivered his bold "thumbs down" on gutting Obamacare, he was protecting Arizona's working families – not betraying them.

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