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By Kurtis Lee, Los Angeles Times (TNS)

Ohio Sen. Rob Portman will run for office in 2016 — but it won’t be for president.

Portman, a Republican who had been weighing a candidacy for the White House, announced Tuesday he’s decided instead to seek a second term in the Senate.

“With the new Republican majority, I see a real opportunity over the next two years to break the gridlock in Washington and actually get things done to help Ohioans and all Americans. That’s where I believe I can play the most constructive role,” Portman said in a statement.

In 2012, Portman was a strong ally of Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney and was in the running to be his vice presidential running mate. Romney instead picked Rep. Paul Ryan (R-OH) as his No. 2. Portman is still viewed as a potential vice presidential candidate for 2016.

Last year, Portman announced his support for same-sex marriage, saying he had changed his previous position after his son told him he was gay. Some Republicans thought his shift on the issue narrowed his chances of winning a GOP presidential primary. For much of 2014, he has raised cash for the party, serving as vice chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee.

Some of Portman’s Republican colleagues in the Senate, including Rand Paul of Kentucky and Ted Cruz of Texas, are strongly considering 2016 presidential runs.

Photo: NASA HQ PHOTO via Flickr

Sen. Lisa Murkowski

Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) declared on Sunday morning that she will oppose any Republican attempt to move ahead with a Supreme Court nomination to fill the seat left by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death.

"For weeks, I have stated that I would not support taking up a potential Supreme Court vacancy this close to the election," said Murkowski in a statement released by her office. "Sadly, what was then a hypothetical is now our reality, but my position has not changed."

The Alaska Republican joined Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME) in opposing Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's announced determination to replace Ginsburg with a Trump appointee. If McConnell loses two more Republican votes, he will be unable to move a nomination before Election Day.