The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Tom Margenau answers more of your Social Security questions in the latest edition of his column, Social Security and You:

Q: I am a certified public accountant. One of my clients, who signed up for his Social Security about a year ago, just got a letter from Social Security’s “Office of Quality Assurance.” The people there want to redo his claim for benefits. And they are asking him to bring in his military discharge papers (he was in the Army 40 years ago), his W-2 records for the past 10 years and other documents. What’s going on? He’s very worried about this.

A: Tell your client to relax. This really is a “no big deal” kind of thing — from his perspective, anyway. But it is a big deal to the Social Security Administration.

The SSA’s Office of Quality Assurance takes a small sampling of Social Security cases and redevelops them. It’s not really to see whether he’s being paid correctly, although they will check into that. But your client shouldn’t worry about this, because historically, Social Security benefit calculations have a very high degree of accuracy. Statistics show that people, in part because of these kinds of reviews, are getting the correct benefit amount about 99 percent of the time.

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, left, and former President Donald Trump.

Photo by Kevin McCarthy (Public domain)

In the professional stratum of politics, few verities are treated with more reverence than the outcome of next year's midterm, when the Republican Party is deemed certain to recapture majorities in the House and Senate. With weary wisdom, any pol or pundit will cite the long string of elections that buttress this prediction.

Political history also tells us that many factors can influence an electoral result, including a national crisis or a change in economic conditions — in other words, things can change and even midterm elections are not entirely foretold. There have been a few exceptions to this rule, too.

Keep reading... Show less
x

Close