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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Reprinted with permission from AlterNet.

 

Despite the president’s record-low approval ratings, a majority of Republicans say they would be willing to postpone the 2020 election if Trump were to propose such a plan. According to the poll conducted by two academic authors and published in the Washington Post, 52 percent support the idea.

The pollsters also found that 47 percent of Republicans believe Trump won the popular vote, while 86 percent believe that millions of illegal immigrants took part in the election. Seventy-three percent think voter fraud happens somewhat often to very often.

Since winning the 2016 election, Trump has insisted that he did, in fact, win the popular vote, “if you deduct the millions of people who voted illegally”—a claim that has been repeatedly debunked.

The poll surveyed 1,325 Americans, with a focus on the 650 participants who identified as Republican in some shape or form. The sample was “weighted to match the population in terms of sex, age, race and education.” Those who believed the previous election was influenced by voter fraud were more inclined to support the postponement of future elections.

If nothing else, these findings prove the tendencies of the Republican Party are as authoritarian as Trump’s.

Jennie Neufeld is a junior writing fellow at AlterNet. She has previously worked for the Observer, the Wild and Nylon Magazine. Follow her on twitter @jennieneufeld.

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