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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

“Every nine seconds we find something new to be outraged about online,” says John Oliver, and he has proof.

But is that really a problem? Oliver argues that public shaming on social media, toxic as it can be, serves a beneficial purpose in certain cases. Consider Tucker Carlson, for example — a powerful racist broadcaster who sounded like a whining baby last week when held accountable for bigoted, misogynist, and just plain sick remarks he made on the radio several years ago.

Oliver takes the opportunity for a few extra-toasty Tucker burns, but he also looks at how an online pile-on can ruin the innocent — and how hard that damage is to redress.

You’ll learn and you’ll laugh. Just click!

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Reprinted with permission from AlterNet

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Reprinted with permission from AlterNet

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