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BOSTON, Massachusetts (AFP) – Jurors on Monday convicted Boston underworld kingpin James “Whitey” Bulger on a raft of murder and other criminal charges, local media reported.

After five days of deliberations, the jury of four women and eight men found Bulger guilty of all but one of the 32 counts he faced.

At the age of 83, Bulger — a fugitive for 16 years before his arrest in California in 2011 — is likely to spend the last days of his life behind bars.

Sentencing was set for November 13.

Bulger had been charged with 19 murders as well as extortion, money laundering and arms trafficking.

His trial, which began June 4, featured chilling testimony from 63 prosecution witnesses — including tales of teeth being pulled from murder victims to prevent their posthumous identification and the strangulation of a mobster’s girlfriend because she “knew too much.”

“The Winter Hill gang and the Mafia acted as judge, jury and sometimes executioners in any dispute. They act as the law in the criminal world,” said prosecutor Fred Wyshak before the jurors began their deliberations.

Michael Flynn

Photo by Tomi T Ahonen/ Twitter

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

President Donald Trump on Wednesday announced a "full pardon" for his former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn, a key figure from the start of Russia investigation and the appointment of Special Counsel Robert Mueller.

Flynn had pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI about his contacts with the Russian ambassador during the 2016 presidential transition. The reason for his lying was never fully explained. He also admitted to working as an unregistered foreign agent for Turkey while serving on the Trump campaign, work that included publishing a ghost-written op-ed in The Hill that argued for extraditing an American resident who is seen as an enemy of the Turkish government. After admitting to his crimes, Flynn attempted to recant and withdraw his guilty plea, an issue which had yet to be resolved by the courts.

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