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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Leonard Pitts Jr. writes that Rush Limbaugh’s continuing popularity is a product of the Republican party’s extremism, in his column, “The Limbaugh Rock: How Low Can You Go?”

If you think Rush Limbaugh is fatally wounded, think again.

By way of explanation, let me tell you how a certain subset of my readers will react to this column. Experience dictates that once I’ve taken my last swipe at their dear leader, Limbaugh’s followers will well … rush to fire off angry emails in his defense. They will do this though there is no defense for what he did on his program last week — calling Georgetown University law student Sandra Fluke a “prostitute” and a “slut” after she testified in support of requiring health insurers to pay for women’s contraception.

His followers will declare, through some arcane “logic” peculiar to true believers, that “Rush” — it’s always “Rush,” as if they and the multimillionaire talk-show host were in the same bowling league — didn’t say what I thought he said, or didn’t mean what I thought he meant.

Point being, he reportedly reaches 15 million people a week who worship him robotically and sycophantically. So it is a fact of life that the advertisers he’s lost as a result of his diarrheic mouth — at least 10 at last count — will soon return, or be replaced.

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House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, left, and former President Donald Trump.

Photo by Kevin McCarthy (Public domain)

In the professional stratum of politics, few verities are treated with more reverence than the outcome of next year's midterm, when the Republican Party is deemed certain to recapture majorities in the House and Senate. With weary wisdom, any pol or pundit will cite the long string of elections that buttress this prediction.

Political history also tells us that many factors can influence an electoral result, including a national crisis or a change in economic conditions — in other words, things can change and even midterm elections are not entirely foretold. There have been a few exceptions to this rule, too.

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