The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

By Liz Reyer, Star Tribune (Minneapolis) (TNS)

Q: My company is going through a large layoff. Not much information has been shared, but I think it’s likely that my team (including me) could be affected. In the meantime, we have a lot of work to do. What advice do you have to help us keep moving forward?

A: Try to remain grounded in the present while making plans for a variety of futures.

THE INNER GAME

“Put on your own oxygen mask first” is a cliche, but it’s true in this case. If you’re falling apart, you can’t help your team. So start by facing your fears. What’s the worst thing that could happen? You lose your job? If that happens, you’ll survive; in fact, I’ve talked with many who ended up in a better role than they had before. Or you keep your position, but your friends and co-workers are gone, and you’re overworked? Understand your fears so you can demystify them.

Now consider what you actually know, and your options for gaining more clarity. Check to see what your boss knows (or can share) and take advantage of information that your company may be sharing. Ask questions whenever you can; you have little to lose by being inquisitive, and it could help you put a realistic plan in place.

Notice how well you’re doing with managing the stress of the situation, and be sure to practice great self-care. Have some fun, get some exercise, eat good food, get enough sleep.

Check in with your team, and determine how they’re doing. Keep in mind that people will have different reactions and different needs. They will also have unique ways of showing their stress, so be attuned to that.

THE OUTER GAME

Realistically, each person on the team — including you — needs two plans: one for if you keep your job and one if you’re let go.

If you stay at your company, recognize that it won’t be the same place. If the layoffs are driven by a fundamental shift in corporate direction, you may need to adapt to new expectations. Further, you’re going to need to be able to accept the new normal and have a positive attitude. That is going to be harder for some people than others, and it’s because of this that some people choose to leave even if they were not laid off. To be blunt, if you won’t be able to be happy or feel secure, you should explore new opportunities.

Anticipating that you may be laid off, now is the time for exploring new opportunities, connecting with folks in your field, and having an updated resume. Don’t wait until the company announces your fate — be laying the groundwork.

And, even though it’s difficult, you need to keep doing your job as well as you can, living up to your own standards of professionalism. Focus on having positive energy and helping your co-workers stay positive, too. Consider using your regular staff meetings to address both the positives and the negatives together so that your team is a support to all of you.

THE LAST WORD

There is a great deal outside your control, but acting on what you can control will help you get through this challenge.

ABOUT THE WRITER
Liz Reyer is a credentialed coach with more than 20 years of business experience. Her company, Reyer Coaching & Consulting, offers services for organizations of all sizes. Submit questions or comments about this column at www.deliverchange.com/coachscorner or email her at liz@deliverchange.com.

(c)2015 Star Tribune, Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC

Image: Gene Han via Flickr

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Anti-abortion demonstrators gather outside the US Supreme Court

Washington (AFP) - The US Supreme Court on Friday ended the right to abortion in a seismic ruling that shreds half a century of constitutional protections on one of the most divisive and bitterly fought issues in American political life.

The conservative-dominated court overturned the landmark 1973 Roe v Wade decision that enshrined a woman's right to an abortion, saying that individual states can now permit or restrict the procedure themselves.

Keep reading... Show less

Sen. Jeanne Shaheen

Sixteen states vying for the early slots in 2024’s presidential primary calendar pitched their case to the Democratic National Committee on Wednesday and Thursday, touting their history, diversity, economies, and electoral competitiveness in the general election.

State party officials, a governor, lt. governors, an attorney general, members of Congress, senior staff and party strategists touted their electorates, industries, heritage, and features that would propel presidential candidates and draw national scrutiny, which pleased the officials on the DNC Rules and Bylaws Committee (RBC). But the panel’s leaders also probed whether Republicans in otherwise promising states would seek to impede a revised Democratic primary calendar.

Keep reading... Show less
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}