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CHICAGO (Reuters) – The police hunt in northern Illinois for three suspects believed to be involved in the fatal shooting of a 30-year veteran police officer entered a second day on Wednesday, as local schools were closed and a vigil for the slain officer was planned.

More than 100 officers, including federal marshals, Illinois State Police and McHenry and Lake County Sheriff’s units, have searched by air and ground in dense woods in the area of Fox Lake, nearly 60 miles (97 km) north of Chicago and close to the Wisconsin border.

Fox Lake Police Lieutenant Charles Joseph Gliniewicz was found wounded on Tuesday morning after reporting that he was pursuing three suspects on foot, the Lake County Sheriff’s Office said. He later died.

Officials described the three suspects as two white males and one black male.

Gliniewicz, a father of four boys and a decorated officer, was known around the village as “G.I. Joe” and was dedicated to Fox Lake and his fellow officers, Mayor Donny Schmit said.

He retired as a first sergeant in the U.S. Army Reserve and earned several awards and commendations in the police department, including a medal of valor, a Fox Lake spokesman said. Gliniewicz had also been involved in a youth law enforcement training program for about a decade.

A vigil for Gliniewicz is planned for Wednesday evening.

As police searched, residents were advised to remain indoors and report suspicious activity.

(Reporting by Suzannah Gonzales; Editing by Susan Heavey)

Police helicopters use search lights on the wooded areas for the killers of slain Fox Lake Police Lieutenant Charles Joseph Gliniewicz in Fox Lake, Illinois, United States, September 1, 2015. REUTERS/Jim Young

Blake Neff

Twitter screenshot

Reprinted with permission from MediaMatters

On July 10, CNN's Oliver Darcy reported that Blake Neff, the top writer for Tucker Carlson's prime-time Fox News show, had been anonymously posting racist, misogynistic, homophobic, and other offensive content on an online forum for five years. Neff used racist and homophobic slurs, referred to women in a derogatory manner, and pushed white supremacist content while writing for Carlson's show. Neff resigned after CNN contacted him for comment.

As Darcy reported, in an interview with the Dartmouth Alumni Magazine, Neff claimed anything Carlson read during his show was initially drafted by him. Darcy also found instances where there was "some overlap between the forum and the show," as sometimes the "material Neff encountered on the forum found its way on to Carlson's show."

During a 2018 appearance on Fox's The Five to promote his book Ship of Fools, Carlson mentioned Neff by name, calling him a "wonderful writer." Carlson also included Neff in the acknowledgments of the book.


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Before joining Fox News, Neff worked at The Daily Caller, a conservative news outlet that Carlson co-founded. The outlet has published a number of white supremacists, anti-Semites, and bigots.


Carlson has a long history of promoting white supremacist content on his show. His show has featured many guests who have connections to white supremacy and far-right extremism. Carlson has regularly been praised by Neo-Nazis and various far-right extremist figures, and he's been a hero on many white supremacist podcasts. Users of the extremist online message boards 4chan and 8chan have repeatedly praised Carlson.

The manifesto released by the gunman who killed 20 people in El Paso, Texas, in 2019 was strewn with content that echoed talking points from Carlson's show. Days after the shooting, Carlson declared that calling white supremacy a serious issue is a "hoax" as it is "actually not a real problem in America."

Carlson has been hemorrhaging advertisers following his racist coverage of the Black Lives Matters movement and the recent protests against police brutality. Now that we know his top writer was using content from white supremacist online message boards for Carlson's show, it is more imperative than ever that advertisers distance their brands away from this toxicity.