The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

By Amy Hubbard, Los Angeles Times

Money worries are killing romance right when we need it, on Valentine’s Day.

The holiday means pricey dinners and sparkly gifts, an outlay of cash — and added financial stress — for many Americans. For those wanting to add some romantic sizzle, money worries are a cold shower.

A recent survey shows money-related stress may be snuffing out sexual desire. A majority of Americans surveyed in the Harris poll, conducted for financial data company Yodlee, thought about money more often than sex — 62 percent of those 18 and older. And 27 percent of those in a relationship said financial worries were negatively affecting their libidos.

“Discussing finances is often stigmatized in American culture,” said Caroline McNally, vice president of marketing for Yodlee, in a news release. “This survey shows just how severely financial stress is affecting Americans’ relationships.”

Comparative wealth doesn’t seem to help. Of those making $100,000 or more, 26 percent said money worries were affecting how often they were intimate with a partner. That’s the same percentage as among households earning $50,000 to $74,900 annually.

Of those obsessing over money, women are in the majority — with 77 percent thinking of money or the lack of it more often than sex. Men are more successful at keeping sex foremost in their thoughts — a little less than half, 46 percent, say money worries trump sex.

But when it comes to men in relationships, just as many men as women find their sexual desire affected by finances: 28 percent of women, 27 percent of men.

When viewed through the lens of geography, the West is the sexiest place to be.

In the South, 66 percent of people thought more about money than sex, more than any other region in the United States. In the West it was 57 percent. The West also had the lowest percentage of people in relationships who said their sex drives were affected by money worries: 24 percent.

The survey was conducted online in the United States from December 6 to 10 among 2,039 adults 18 and older. Some figures were weighted to reflect actual proportions in the population. The online survey was not based on a probability sample so no estimate of theoretical sampling error was calculated.

Photo: StacyA via Flickr

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Marchers at January 22 anti-vaccination demonstration in Washington, D.C>

Back when it was first gaining traction in the 1990s, the anti-vaccination movement was largely considered a far-left thing, attracting believers ranging from barter-fair hippies to New Age gurus and their followers to “holistic medicine” practitioners. And it largely remained that way … until 2020 and the arrival of the COVID-19 pandemic.

As this Sunday’s “Defeat the Mandates” march in Washington, D.C., however, showed us, there’s no longer anything even remotely left-wing about the movement. Populated with Proud Boys and “Patriot” militiamen, QAnoners and other Alex Jones-style conspiracists who blithely indulge in Holocaust relativism and other barely disguised antisemitism, and ex-hippies who now spout right-wing propaganda—many of them, including speakers, encouraging and threatening violence—the crowd at the National Mall manifested the reality that “anti-vaxxers” now constitute a full-fledged far-right movement, and a potentially violent one at that.

Keep reading... Show less
x
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}