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Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) spoke on the floor of the Senate on Monday evening about the ridiculous demands House Republicans were making in exchange for keeping the government open.

“Republicans have decided that the single most important issue facing our nation is to change the law so that employers can deny women access to birth control coverage,” she said. “In fact, letting employers decide whether women can get birth control covered on their insurance plans is so important that the Republicans are willing to shutter the government and potentially tank the economy over whether women can get access to birth control in the year 2013 — not the year 1913 — the year 2013.”

The senior senator from Massachusetts went on to detail the process that had led to the shutdown, including the Senate’s passing a budget that replaces the automatic cuts known as the sequester, which will cost our economy 900,000 jobs.

She went on to detail why the cuts are so disastrous to research and the battle against America’s leading cause of death — heart disease.

Elizabeth Warren

(h/t Democracy For America)

Michael Flynn

Photo by Tomi T Ahonen/ Twitter

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

President Donald Trump on Wednesday announced a "full pardon" for his former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn, a key figure from the start of Russia investigation and the appointment of Special Counsel Robert Mueller.

Flynn had pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI about his contacts with the Russian ambassador during the 2016 presidential transition. The reason for his lying was never fully explained. He also admitted to working as an unregistered foreign agent for Turkey while serving on the Trump campaign, work that included publishing a ghost-written op-ed in The Hill that argued for extraditing an American resident who is seen as an enemy of the Turkish government. After admitting to his crimes, Flynn attempted to recant and withdraw his guilty plea, an issue which had yet to be resolved by the courts.

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