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The Obama re-election campaign, insisting it cannot “afford to play by two sets of rules,” has announced publicly that it will encourage donations to Priorities USA, its allied Super PAC — and is working hard to justify the decision in the face of inevitable media (and partisan) blowback.

Observers immediately reminded voters that Obama called out the Supreme Court justices in his 2011 State of the Union speech for their Citizens United decision, which, coupled with related rulings, enabled unlimited Super PAC donations. But it is also true that efforts by Obama and Democrats in Congress to mitigate that ruling via the DISCLOSE Act were blocked by the Republican minority in the Senate in 2010.

National Memo Editor-in-Chief Joe Conason appeared on MSNBC’s Jansing & Co. Tuesday morning to discuss the matter — and questioned Republican outrage over Obama’s choice:

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Senior campaign officials held a conference to follow up on their announcement, saying the president, vice president, and first lady will not take part in Priorities USA fundraising, but that the campaign would lend logistical and other support to the committee. They repeatedly invoked the Cold War concept of mutually assured destruction, insisting they could not “unliterally disarm” when it comes to third-party spending.

Wealthy Democratic donors now have the green light to back Priorities and other outside groups helping the president.

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Marchers at January 22 anti-vaccination demonstration in Washington, D.C>

Back when it was first gaining traction in the 1990s, the anti-vaccination movement was largely considered a far-left thing, attracting believers ranging from barter-fair hippies to New Age gurus and their followers to “holistic medicine” practitioners. And it largely remained that way … until 2020 and the arrival of the COVID-19 pandemic.

As this Sunday’s “Defeat the Mandates” march in Washington, D.C., however, showed us, there’s no longer anything even remotely left-wing about the movement. Populated with Proud Boys and “Patriot” militiamen, QAnoners and other Alex Jones-style conspiracists who blithely indulge in Holocaust relativism and other barely disguised antisemitism, and ex-hippies who now spout right-wing propaganda—many of them, including speakers, encouraging and threatening violence—the crowd at the National Mall manifested the reality that “anti-vaxxers” now constitute a full-fledged far-right movement, and a potentially violent one at that.

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