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The Obama re-election campaign, insisting it cannot “afford to play by two sets of rules,” has announced publicly that it will encourage donations to Priorities USA, its allied Super PAC — and is working hard to justify the decision in the face of inevitable media (and partisan) blowback.

Observers immediately reminded voters that Obama called out the Supreme Court justices in his 2011 State of the Union speech for their Citizens United decision, which, coupled with related rulings, enabled unlimited Super PAC donations. But it is also true that efforts by Obama and Democrats in Congress to mitigate that ruling via the DISCLOSE Act were blocked by the Republican minority in the Senate in 2010.

National Memo Editor-in-Chief Joe Conason appeared on MSNBC’s Jansing & Co. Tuesday morning to discuss the matter — and questioned Republican outrage over Obama’s choice:

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Senior campaign officials held a conference to follow up on their announcement, saying the president, vice president, and first lady will not take part in Priorities USA fundraising, but that the campaign would lend logistical and other support to the committee. They repeatedly invoked the Cold War concept of mutually assured destruction, insisting they could not “unliterally disarm” when it comes to third-party spending.

Wealthy Democratic donors now have the green light to back Priorities and other outside groups helping the president.

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For a long time, inflation has been the phantom of the American economy: often expected but never seen. But the latest Consumer Price Index, which showed that prices rose by five percent from May of last year to May of this year, raises fears that it is breaking down the front door and taking over the guest room.

The price jump was the biggest one-month increase since 2008. It appears to support the warning of former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers, who wrote in February that President Joe Biden's budget binge could "set off inflationary pressures of a kind we have not seen in a generation." Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell charged last month that the administration has already produced "raging inflation."

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