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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

President Obama’s re-election campaign has released a brutal new ad attacking Mitt Romney’s record at Bain Capital.

The ad, entitled “Steel,” tells the story of a Kansas City steel plant which Bain Capital purchased and then shut down — after making a huge profit.

“It was like a vampire,” one laid off worker says. “They came in and sucked the life out of us.”

“Bain Capital walked away with a lot of money that they made off this plant,” says another. “We view Mitt Romney as a job destroyer.”

“If he’s going to run the country the way he ran his business, I wouldn’t want him there.”

The Obama campaign has also created a companion website to go along with the ad.

“Steel” follows roughly the same structure as the Newt Gingrich-aligned Super PAC Winning Our Future’s devastating attack film, “The King of Bain.” Both ads use testimonials from laid off workers to undermine the central thesis of Romney’s campaign: that his private sector experience taught him how to create jobs.

Gingrich’s ad was very successful, helping to contribute to the former Speaker’s blowout win in South Carolina.

 

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House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, left, and former President Donald Trump.

Photo by Kevin McCarthy (Public domain)

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