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Chicago (AFP) – President Barack Obama on Tuesday condemned the violence that erupted in Ferguson in the wake of the decision not to charge a white police officer over the fatal shooting of a black teenager.

“Burning buildings, torching cars, destroying property, putting people at risk … there’s no excuse for it,” Obama said in Chicago, calling for anyone found guilty of involvement to be prosecuted.

“Those are criminal acts,” Obama added, while expressing sympathy for minorities who felt laws were not being enforced “uniformly or fairly.”

Obama urged parties aggrieved by events in Ferguson to work peacefully to achieve change, saying the case had exposed “an American problem.”

“The bottom line is nothing of significance, nothing of benefit results from destructive acts,” he said.

“I’ve never seen a civil rights law or a health care bill or an immigration bill result because a car got burned.

“It happened because people vote. It happened because people mobilize, people organize — it happens because people look at what are the best policies to solve the problem.”

AFP Photo/Mandel Ngan

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Jeff Danziger lives in New York City. He is represented by CWS Syndicate and the Washington Post Writers Group. He is the recipient of the Herblock Prize and the Thomas Nast (Landau) Prize. He served in the US Army in Vietnam and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Air Medal. He has published eleven books of cartoons, a novel and a memoir. Visit him at DanzigerCartoons.

Participants hold placards as they mark Martin Luther King Jr. Day in Washington D.C. on January 17, 2022

Washington (AFP) - Members of Martin Luther King Jr's family joined marchers Monday in Washington urging Congress to pass voting rights reform as the United States marked the holiday commemorating the slain civil rights leader.

King's son Martin Luther King III spoke at the march, warning that many states "have passed laws that make it harder to vote" more than half a century after the activism of his father.

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