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WASHINGTON (AFP) – U.S. President Barack Obama will mark the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King’s “I have a dream” speech by speaking from the same steps at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington.

The August 28 event in the U.S. capital will take place on the exact spot where King delivered his famous address on the same day in 1963.

Obama, the first black U.S. president, will speak about the half century that has passed since the “March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom,” which culminated with remarks by the Atlanta pastor and civil rights icon.

In 1963 King spoke in front of 250,000 people, explaining his wish for better relations between black and white Americans.

His words were engraved on the steps of the monument where he spoke.

President Lyndon B. Johnson, who took over when president John F. Kennedy was assassinated just four months after King spoke in Washington, signed landmark civil rights laws in 1964 and 1965.

Washington will celebrate the MLK anniversary August 21 through 28 with religious services, a march in King’s footsteps and a festival.

Photo Credit: AFP

Michael Flynn

Photo by Tomi T Ahonen/ Twitter

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

President Donald Trump on Wednesday announced a "full pardon" for his former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn, a key figure from the start of Russia investigation and the appointment of Special Counsel Robert Mueller.

Flynn had pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI about his contacts with the Russian ambassador during the 2016 presidential transition. The reason for his lying was never fully explained. He also admitted to working as an unregistered foreign agent for Turkey while serving on the Trump campaign, work that included publishing a ghost-written op-ed in The Hill that argued for extraditing an American resident who is seen as an enemy of the Turkish government. After admitting to his crimes, Flynn attempted to recant and withdraw his guilty plea, an issue which had yet to be resolved by the courts.

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