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WASHINGTON (AFP) – U.S. President Barack Obama will mark the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King’s “I have a dream” speech by speaking from the same steps at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington.

The August 28 event in the U.S. capital will take place on the exact spot where King delivered his famous address on the same day in 1963.

Obama, the first black U.S. president, will speak about the half century that has passed since the “March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom,” which culminated with remarks by the Atlanta pastor and civil rights icon.

In 1963 King spoke in front of 250,000 people, explaining his wish for better relations between black and white Americans.

His words were engraved on the steps of the monument where he spoke.

President Lyndon B. Johnson, who took over when president John F. Kennedy was assassinated just four months after King spoke in Washington, signed landmark civil rights laws in 1964 and 1965.

Washington will celebrate the MLK anniversary August 21 through 28 with religious services, a march in King’s footsteps and a festival.

Photo Credit: AFP

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

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Just over year before her untimely death on Friday, the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg appeared as a guest lecturer for the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, AR with National Public Radio correspondent Nina Totenberg. The crowd that signed up to see "Notorious RBG" live was so large that the event had to be moved to a major sports arena – and they weren't disappointed by the wide-ranging, hour-long interview.

Witty, charming, brilliant, principled, Ginsburg represented the very best of American liberalism and modern feminism. Listen to her and you'll feel even more deeply what former President Bill Clinton says in his poignant introduction: "Only one of us in this room appointed her…but all of us hope that she will stay on that court forever."