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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Reprinted with permission from AlterNet.

In his Friday New York Times column, Paul Krugman outlined a new “axis of climate evil” that includes the fossil fuel industry, anti-regulation corporate defenders (like the Wall Street Journal editorial page) and the usual GOP suspects.

Krugman argues that the U.S. is now “controlled by a party within which climate denial — rejecting not just scientific evidence but also obvious lived experience, and fiercely opposing any effort to slow the trend — has become a defining marker of tribal identity.”

According to Krugman, monied interests are engaging in an “epidemic of bad faith” that could result in the destruction of the planet. Those with financial stakes in polluting activities partner with anti-government conservatives to squash responsible climate policy before it restricts their interests. The result is an “axis of climate evil” where corporate self-interest and extremist ideology converge.

While progressives may feel “better than they expected” under the bumbling administration of President Donald Trump, Krugman argues that conservatives’ inability to pass various legislation doesn’t change the fact that anti-environment forces control the country and have already pushed us to the brink of environmental collapse.

Chris Sosa is an associate editor at AlterNet. His work has appeared in Mic, Salon, Care2, Huffington Post and other publications. Previously, he was a campaign specialist and media spokesperson for People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals. Follow him on Twitter @ChrisSosa.

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Stacey Abrams

Photo by Biden For President is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Reprinted with permission from Daily Kos

File this under asked and answered. Former Georgia House minority leader and voting rights advocate Stacey Abrams trended much of the day on Wednesday after Republican Sen. John Kennedy questioned whether she thought a restrictive voting bill signed into law last month is racist. "I think there are provisions of it that are racist, yes," the former Georgia gubernatorial candidate answered. Abrams was speaking during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on voting rights on Tuesday when Kennedy made the mistake of asking her for a list of the provisions she objects to in the Georgia legislation.

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