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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Recently uncovered evidence shows that Paul Ryan quietly requested Affordable Care Act funding while simultaneously campaigning for the law to be repealed, in one of his most glaring acts of hypocrisy yet.

Lee Fang reports in The Nation that Ryan wrote a letter to the Department of Health and Human Services on December 10, 2010, recommending a grant to build a new facility in his district. As Fang points out, “The grant Ryan requested was funded directly by the Affordable Care Act, better known simply as healthcare reform or Obamacare.”

Ryan’s letter can be seen here.

While trying to build a community health clinic shouldn’t be controversial, it is when the request comes from Rep. Ryan. Over the past three years, Ryan has been one of the most vocal opponents of the law that he calls an abomination. Yet it didn’t stop him from requesting “job killing,” “budget busting” funds for his district.

Apparently, while Ryan thinks that health care rights “come from nature and God,” he acknowledges that money for his district comes from the government.

This isn’t the first time that Ryan has been caught using a government program that he derides; in August, it was revealed that Ryan had requested stimulus money while simultaneously claiming that “I’m not one who votes for something and then writes to the government to ask them to send us money.”

As Bill Clinton said last night: “it takes some brass” to be Paul Ryan.

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Sen. Chuck Grassley

Reprinted with permission from DailyKos

Last year, Senate Republicans were already feeling so desperate about their upcoming midterm prospects that they rushed to wish Sen. Chuck Grassley of Iowa a speedy and full recovery from COVID-19 so that he could run for reelection in 2022. The power of incumbency is a huge advantage for any politician, and Republicans were clinging to the idea of sending Grassley—who will be 89 when the '22 general election rolls around—back to the upper chamber for another six-year term.

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