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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton both won undeniable and massive victories in New York, which both call home. In her victory speech, Clinton thanked the people of the Empire State for having her back, saying “this was personal” – while Trump trumpeted New Yorkers as “the people who know us best.”

Yet in the vote totals reported from the precincts closest to Trump’s and Clinton’s actual homes, an amusing wrinkle appeared. In Westchester County, where the Clintons have lived since 2001, Hillary’s longtime neighbors backed her by a margin of well over 20 points, or more than 60 percent.

But in Manhattan, where Trump has lived ever since he departed Queens sometime in the 1970s, he lost narrowly to the Governor of Ohio.

Rejecting Trump, his neighbors voted for a guy who eats pizza with a fork.

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House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, left, and former President Donald Trump.

Photo by Kevin McCarthy (Public domain)

In the professional stratum of politics, few verities are treated with more reverence than the outcome of next year's midterm, when the Republican Party is deemed certain to recapture majorities in the House and Senate. With weary wisdom, any pol or pundit will cite the long string of elections that buttress this prediction.

Political history also tells us that many factors can influence an electoral result, including a national crisis or a change in economic conditions — in other words, things can change and even midterm elections are not entirely foretold. There have been a few exceptions to this rule, too.

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