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When an attorney tossed out the notion that his client Alex Jones is a “performance artist,” like so much chum in the media waters, how could Trevor Noah resist a bite?

Noting that the lawyer’s “he’s just a radio character” defense emerged in a child custody case following Jones’ divorce, Noah plays an alarming clip of the maniacal Infowars host and wonders how any woman could possibly want to leave him — or why the former Mrs. Jones would think he shouldn’t be raising children.

The problem is that however fake his news act,  the fans of “performance artist Alex Jones”  think his nonsensical ranting is real. They may even act out in response, like the nutcase who showed up at Comet Pizza to search for pedophiles with a loaded gun that he proceeded to fire in the Washington restaurant.

And the thoughtful Noah can’t help wondering whether that most famous Jones fan, Donald J. Trump may be a performance artist, too — a theory he illustrates hilariously.

Whatever happens in that Texas court case, Jones will always have custody of “the biggest child in the world.”

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