The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Almost two-thirds of Americans support including a pathway to citizenship in any immigration reform deal, according to a new poll from the Public Religion Research Institute.

The poll, which was released on Monday, finds that 63 percent of Americans favor providing a way for undocumented immigrants to become citizens if they meet certain requirements. Support for a pathway to citizenship cuts across party lines; 73 percent of Democrats, 60 percent of Republicans, and 57 percent of Independents favor that approach, which the Senate adopted in the bipartisan reform bill it passed over the summer.

Just 14 percent of Americans support a plan allowing undocumented immigrants to become permanent legal residents, but not citizens. This is the approach favored by many Republicans who recognize the need to reform the immigration system, but consider a path to citizenship to be “amnesty.” Politically, this tactic is clearly a non-starter — indeed, it is even less popular than a policy that would simply deport all undocumented immigrants (this is supported by 18 percent).

The poll also confirms that Americans are eager to see the House act on reform; 34 percent believe that the immigration system is completely broken — up from 23 percent in PRRI’s March 2013 poll — and 31 percent believe that it is mostly broken. Furthermore, 41 percent believe that reforming the system should be an immediate priority for President Obama and Congress — up from 37 percent in March — while 42 percent say that it should be a priority over the next couple of years. Just 14 percent say it should not be a priority at all.

The issue is still a prime concern for President Obama. The president is scheduled to deliver a speech on the topic in San Francisco on Monday, in which he is expected to reiterate his call for the House of Representatives to act on comprehensive reform as soon as possible. House Republicans have said that they will not vote on reform this year, although Speaker John Boehner insists that reform is not dead.

Despite the political pressure and the public’s strong preference for reform, however, there is reason to doubt that punting on the issue will hold serious electoral consequences for the Republican Party — raising the odds that they will decline to act before the 2014 midterm elections.

Photo: SEIU International via Flickr

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Ivanka Trump told the House Select Committee investigating the violent January 6, 2021, attack on the U.S. Capitol that she accepted former Attorney General William P. Barr’s assertions that her father’s stolen election claims are “bullshit.”

But the New York Times revealed on Tuesday that for more than a month after the election, Trump’s fruitless legal crusade to overturn the 2020 election results had his eldest daughter’s complete and total backing. Per the Times, Ivanka told a documentary film crew in mid-December 2020 that she wanted Trump to “continue to fight until every legal remedy is exhausted” because “a lot of Americans” were supposedly questioning “the sanctity of our elections.”

Keep reading... Show less

Wandrea "Shaye" Moss

YouTube Screenshot

Georgia election worker Wandrea “Shaye” Moss was collateral damage in Fox News’ campaign to prop up Donald Trump’s false claims of election fraud following the 2020 presidential election.

In December 2020, the network’s prime-time hosts and “straight news” personnel alike baselessly suggested that Moss and her mother and fellow election worker, Ruby Freeman, had participated in a fraud scheme. The Fox personalities don’t seem to regret their actions: After Moss described the impact those conspiracy theories had on her life to the January 6 House select committee on Tuesday, the network devoted all of 14 seconds to her testimony.

Keep reading... Show less
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}