The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

By Megan Cassella

WASHINGTON (Reuters) — More than one in four Americans are hoping the soon-to-be redesigned $10 bill will feature Eleanor Roosevelt, according to a McClatchy-Marist poll released Wednesday.

The poll showed the former first lady in first place with 27 percent, trailed by African-American abolitionist Harriet Tubman, who received 17 percent of 1,249 votes, and Native American explorer Sacagawea, who received 13 percent.

Who will replace Alexander Hamilton on the bill has been the subject of much debate since Treasury Secretary Jack Lew announced in June it will be the first in more than a century to feature a woman.

The announcement followed a social media campaign “Women on 20s.” The government then announced it would put a woman on the 10-dollar bill, spawning another online discussion led by the hashtag “#TheNew10.”

At a breakfast with reporters last week, Lew said the administration had since received about 1.5 million pieces of feedback from the public on the bill’s redesign, with inputs ranging from tweets and retweets to handwritten letters.

Other finalists in the McClatchy-Marist poll were women’s rights activist Susan B. Anthony and pilot Amelia Earhart, who each received 11 percent of the vote. Former Supreme Court justice Sandra Day O’Connor garnered a distant 4 percent.

Roosevelt had a larger lead among women, earning 33 percent of the votes after they were broken down by gender. When votes were sorted according to race, Tubman led among African Americans with 47 percent, results showed.

Lew said the administration is taking the summer to listen to the public’s feedback, but he would not say when he would announce the final design.

The bill, which will be the first designed under a new theme of democracy, is set to be released in 2020.

(Reporting by Megan Cassella; Editing by David Gregorio)

Photo: Eleanor Roosevelt on Fifth Avenue in New York, 1940. (REUTERS/Roosevelt Library)

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Jeff Danziger lives in New York City. He is represented by CWS Syndicate and the Washington Post Writers Group. He is the recipient of the Herblock Prize and the Thomas Nast (Landau) Prize. He served in the US Army in Vietnam and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Air Medal. He has published eleven books of cartoons and one novel. Visit him at DanzigerCartoons.

The late Sen. John McCain

I don't know Kyrsten Sinema, but I did know John McCain. Not at all intimately, to be sure, but just enough to say -- despite her pretensions and the fantasies of her flacks that she is the reincarnation of the war hero in a purple wig -- that Kyrsten Sinema is no John McCain.

Lately Sinema has advertised herself as a "maverick," by which she means that she flouts the positions and policies of her party's leadership, and is supposed to pair her with McCain, who sometimes strayed from the Republican party line. Her most notorious attempt at imitation occurred last year with a gesture on the Senate floor marking her vote against a minimum wage increase. Her coy mimicry of the admired war hero was synthetic, leaving an unpleasant odor in its wake. When McCain delivered his bold "thumbs down" on gutting Obamacare, he was protecting Arizona's working families – not betraying them.

Keep reading... Show less
x
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}