The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

By Alana Wise

WASHINGTON (Reuters) — Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump assailed a leading committee chairman in Congress on Sunday for backing Marco Rubio, Trump’s rival for the party’s nomination.

Trump, the front-runner in the Republican race, needled Trey Gowdy for his role as chairman of the House of Representatives select committee investigating the 2012 attack in Benghazi, Libya, in which four Americans were killed.

In October, Hillary Clinton, 68, front-runner for the Democratic nomination, calmly deflected committee criticism of her handling of the attack while she was President Barack Obama’s secretary of state.

“In total (the committee) was not good for Republicans and the country. I mean beyond Republicans, it was bad for the country. I hope he does a whole lot better for Marco,” Trump, 69, said of Gowdy on Fox News’ Fox and Friends.

The conservative news site Townhall reported Gowdy’s planned endorsement, and an email from the Rubio campaign confirmed that Gowdy, a South Carolina Republican, would travel with Rubio, 44, on the campaign trail on Tuesday and Wednesday.

“Marco is a rock solid conservative and a strong leader we can trust. I look forward to campaigning in Iowa with him, and introducing my good friend to voters across the state,” Gowdy said in a statement.

A billionaire businessman and former reality TV star, Trump further needled Gowdy online, retweeting a number of messages critical of Gowdy and the committee.

“Face it, Trey Gowdy failed miserably on Benghazi. He allowed it to drag out and in the end, let Hillary get away with murder,” one user wrote.

Despite Trump’s critique, a Gowdy endorsement could boost Rubio, a U.S. senator from Florida who trails Trump in most national opinion polls but has been on the rise ahead of the first contest for the nomination, scheduled for Iowa on Feb. 1.

Rubio pulls 8.5 percent Republican support behind Trump’s 39.3 percent, Ted Cruz’s 12.8 percent and Ben Carson’s 9.6 percent in a national rolling five-day Reuters/Ipsos survey issued on Dec. 24.

(Reporting by Alana Wise; Editing by Howard Goller)

Photo: Committee Chairman, U.S. Representative Trey Gowdy (R-SC) arrives before Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton is set to testify before his House Select Committee on Benghazi about the attack on a U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi, Libya, on Capitol Hill in Washington, October 22, 2015. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Gov. Greg Abbott

Youtube Screenshot

Less than two weeks after a gunman fatally shot ten people in a supermarket in Buffalo, New York, the United States suffered yet another mass shooting when, on Tuesday, May 24, a gunman killed at least 21 people in an elementary school in Uvalde, Texas — including 19 children. And hours after that massacre, according to the Dallas Morning News, Gov. Greg Abbott attended a campaign fundraising event in East Texas.

The event was held at a time when other Texas officials were canceling similar events because of the Uvalde tragedy. Abbott, who has been endorsed by former President Donald Trump and is seeking a third term, recently defeated challengers in Texas’ 2022 GOP gubernatorial primary — and he is now competing with Democratic gubernatorial nominee Beto O’Rourke, a former congressman and 2020 presidential candidate, in the general election.

Keep reading... Show less

Mark Meadows

A former White House aide told the House Select Committee that Mark Meadows, former President Trump’s ex-White House Chief of Staff, incinerated documents in his office after meeting with a House Republican who was part of a broad GOP effort to overturn the 2020 election results, according to a Politico report.

The testimony was obtained from a former Meadows aide, Cassidy Hutchinson, who had already testified that Meadows was warned that Republican plans to overturn the election with sham electors weren’t “legally sound” and that Trump’s January 6 rally could turn violent.

Keep reading... Show less
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}