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What Pundits Call A “Moderate” Senate Health Care Bill Will Kill People

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What Pundits Call A “Moderate” Senate Health Care Bill Will Kill People

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Reprinted with permission from MediaMatters.

As Senate Republicans unveil the draft of their health care proposal, the Better Care Reconciliation Act of 2017, media have already taken to framing the Senate GOP’s attempt at destroying the Affordable Care Act (ACA) as “more moderate” than a similar bill passed by the House last month. But comparing the Senate bill to the House bill whitewashes the portions of the proposal that are in fact at least as extreme as the previous one and the immense harm they would do to American people if this bill became law.

After drafting the bill with an “almost-unprecedented opacity,” Senate Republicans finally publicly introduced their health care proposal on June 22. The Senate draft comes over a month after the House of Representatives passed the American Health Care Act (AHCA) on May 4. Several reports on the Senate health care bill, however, are deceptively framed as they suggest that the bill is “more moderate” than its counterpart passed by the House. The New York Times wrote that the Senate version was “in some respects, more moderate than the House bill” because it offers “more financial assistance to some lower-income people to help them defray the rapidly rising cost of private health insurance.” USA Today speculated that if the Senate passes the bill, it would “likely to be more moderate than what the House passed.” Additionally, Fox News’ Peter Doocy stated the bill appeared “more moderate than the House version” because it would “let states that took more Medicaid money” under the ACA’s Medicaid expansion “keep more of it for longer than the House bill would.”

Calling the Senate bill “more moderate” than the House’s AHCA is a low bar and framing the Senate bill that way is deceptive. First of all, the House bill is nowhere close to moderate. According to the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO), the AHCA would increase “the number of uninsured people relative to the number projected” under the ACA by 23 million by 2026. Additionally, under the AHCA, those with pre-existing conditions would be in jeopardy of losing coverage. At the very least, those with pre-existing conditions would face skyrocketing premiums. And those who want policies to cover essential health benefits, like maternity care and mental health and substance abuse services, are “likely to be priced out of the market,” according to NBC News. It would be hard to imagine a bill less moderate than the AHCA.

The Senate bill is largely a replica of the AHCA that also includes its own extreme measures. As NBC News reported, the Senate draft “makes deeper cuts” to Medicaid “in the long run” compared to the House bill. And according to the Center for American Progress, the Senate bill’s essential health benefit waivers would “erode or eliminate financial protections for about 27 million workers and their dependents,” including those who are in employer health care plans.

As Andy Slavitt, the former acting administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, noted, “The Senate bill needs to be compared to current law, not the House bill.” People will die if this bill becomes law. That’s the context reporters should be using when discussing this new proposal.

 

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9 Comments

  1. FireBaron June 26, 2017

    Of course, Mike Lee from Utah doesn’t want to support it because it is insufficiently draconian for his liking. He believes no state should require any minimum level of coverage! And every time he opens his mouth with a statement like that, Orrin Hatch pounds his head against a desk to try to drive the stupid out.

    Reply
    1. I know a joke June 26, 2017

      Question: is Hatch pounding Lee’s head, or his own? I mean, I’m fine with either tbh.

    2. BoyPinoy June 26, 2017

      Wouldn’t that make a great video?

  2. 788eddie June 26, 2017

    A lot of core tRump supporters are also second-amendment supporters. It will be interesting to see if, after losing their healthcare, some seek “second-amendment remedies.” I’m not comfortable about this situation.

    Reply
    1. BoyPinoy June 26, 2017

      No kidding. Second amendment remedies. What would that be like?

      1. 788eddie June 26, 2017

        Could keep some people up at night, especially those senators who pushed to take away somebody’s health insurance to give the already wealthy another tax cut.

  3. idamag June 26, 2017

    The United States is one of the most violent countries in the world. They also appear to be one of the most selfish countries. There are businesses that saw money to be made of others’ misfortunes and jumped on the bandwagon. This goes for any type of service that is a necessity. Funerals homes are becoming big business and many of them are no longer local, but part of a big conglomerate. Most hospitals are for profit. Nursing homes cost $8,000/month and upwards. They do not have doctors at the facility. Most of the employees are entry level low wage people they hire off the street who are willing to use the facility as a stepping stone to a better job. Insurance companies gleefully accept premiums until the insured starts costing a lot and then they would like to go back to the cap. Your costs reach a certain number and you are out. They dictate, to the hospital, how long a patient can stay and no one gets to stay if they are dying. They ship them off to a nursing home where they can be neglected.

    Reply
    1. BoyPinoy June 26, 2017

      Violent and selfish. Tsk tsk.

      1. Independent1 June 27, 2017

        Such is reality these days given the corrupt rule of Republicans that is turning many parts of American into miserable places to live!! (According to Gallup-Healthways all 10 of America’s most miserable places to live are run by the GOP. The most miserable being West Virginia and then: Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Arkansas, Tennessee, and last but not least – Oklahoma.)

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