The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Conservatives are fed up with social distancing to slow the coronavirus. After days of them demanding a fixed date for the end of the COVID-19 crisis, Donald Trump basically endorsed their demands on Sunday night.

On Friday, Rep. Chip Roy (R-TX) penned a National Review piece called “America Needs a Date Certain.” In it, he wrote that “our government’s response has put thousands of American businesses on the brink of insolvency, and millions are now jobless” and predicts that this will “only continue unless the government provides certainty of action.”

“The most important thing we need to do — right now — is to announce a date to signal our economic restart, get folks back to work, and build the confidence we need to get capital flowing,” Roy demanded. “Perhaps that date should be around April 1. Perhaps it should be April 15. In consultation with our nation’s health experts, the federal government must announce a date within the coming weeks, no later.”

His fellow Texas Republican, Rep. Dan Crenshaw, endorsed the call, tweeting Friday, “We MUST do everything in our power to provide a reasonable, health-informed, date for when Americans can safely return to regular economic activity in their communities.”

An array of conservative media commentators spent the weekend echoing the demand.

Fox News host Laura Ingraham tweeted Friday, “The uncertainty for businesses, parents and kids is just not sustainable.” On Monday, she added, “Even another week of this will mean millions more out of work, massive damage to businesses big and small, rental incomes, families at every income level, horrific pain and suffering. But if we knew this was almost over, recovery would be easier.”

Conservative columnist Josh Hammer tweeted Sunday, “This will not end well for capitalism. It will not end well for the rule of law. It will not end well for republican self-governance. Unless it is all shepherded to an end quickly and efficiently, as soon as is remotely feasible.”

And former Trump adviser Gary Cohn asked, “Is it time to start discussing the need for a date when the economy can turn back on?”

Late Sunday night, Donald Trump joined in.

“WE CANNOT LET THE CURE BE WORSE THAN THE PROBLEM ITSELF. AT THE END OF THE 15 DAY PERIOD, WE WILL MAKE A DECISION AS TO WHICH WAY WE WANT TO GO!” he tweeted.

He followed his own tweet with a series of retweets of supporters agreeing that everyone should get back to normal in 15 days.

With testing still at a minimum in the United States and not everyone practicing social distancing, epidemiologists have no idea when the crisis will actually start to slow.

The surgeon general predicted on Monday, “This week, it’s going to get bad.”

Published with permission of The American Independent Foundation.

Photo credit: Gage Skidmore

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Rep. Lauren Boebert

YouTube Screenshot

For far-right Rep. Lauren Boebert of Colorado, owning a gun-themed restaurant called Shooters Grill has been a major promotional tool among fellow MAGA Republicans and members of the National Rifle Association (NRA). But according to Daily Beast reporter Roger Sollenberger, Boebert’s promotional tool may be in trouble: Sollenberger reports that Boebert’s restaurant is “facing an uncertain” future now that the new landlord of the property she has been renting has announced that he won’t be renewing her lease.

In an article published by the Beast on June 23, Sollenberger describes the property’s new landlord as a “marijuana retailer.”

Keep reading... Show less

Former President Donald Trump

YouTube Screenshot

Publicly, former President Donald Trump is taking credit for the U.S. Supreme Court's overturning of Roe v. Wade and ultimately revoking women's right to legal abortions. But, behind closed doors, he reportedly is not thrilled about the ruling.

According to Rolling Stone, "privately, the former president is anxious about what the end of Roe, and the flood of extreme Republican state-level anti-abortion laws it will unleash, will mean for the GOP’s electoral prospects — and for his own."

Keep reading... Show less
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}