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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Scott Van Duzer, the Florida restauranteur who lifted President Obama off the ground in a bear hug when Obama visited his pizzeria on Sunday, thought that he was just creating a lighthearted photo-op. Unfortunately, Van Duzer underestimated how rabidly the right-wing fringe hates the president.

Republicans have organized a boycott of Big Apple Pizza because Van Duzer had the gall to greet the President of the United States. Additionally, legions of right wingers have flooded Big Apple Pizza’s Yelp page with hundreds of negative reviews, ranging from insults about its pizza to outright racist attacks against Obama.

Evidently the right wing only likes right-wing small business owners. Ironically, Van Duzer himself is a registered Republican (not that that has ever stopped the wingnuts from grabbing their pitchforks in the past — just ask Dick Lugar.)

Van Duzer’s Yelp page has since been flooded by five star reviews to counterbalance the attacks, and several of the nuttier “reviews” have been flagged and removed. Some remain however — here are eight of the craziest:

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Pro-Trump GETTR Becoming 'Safe Haven' For Terrorist Propaganda

Photo by Thomas Hawk is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

Just weeks after former President Trump's team quietly launched the alternative to "social media monopolies," GETTR is being used to promote terrorist propaganda from supporters of the Islamic State, a Politico analysis found.

The publication reports that the jihadi-related material circulating on the social platform includes "graphic videos of beheadings, viral memes that promote violence against the West and even memes of a militant executing Trump in an orange jumpsuit similar to those used in Guantanamo Bay."

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Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Although QAnon isn't a religious movement per se, the far-right conspiracy theorists have enjoyed some of their strongest support from white evangelicals — who share their adoration of former President Donald Trump. And polling research from The Economist and YouGov shows that among those who are religious, White evangelicals are the most QAnon-friendly.

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