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Seth Meyers offers a closer look at Trump’s “desperate” quest for positive accomplishments in his first 100 days — and finds a presidency that resembles a juvenile session of Mad Libs.

Unable to pass legislation, despite Republican majorities in Congress, Trump is touting the executive orders he has signed — a tactic he memorably denounced as a disaster under his predecessor, whom he accused of wanting to quit work “and play golf.”  Lickspittle Chris Christie, whose low approval numbers in New Jersey rival Trump’s dismal ratings, praised the executive orders as well — although he too  excoriated Obama as a “dictator” and “a petulant child” for the same presidential maneuver.

To his long list of broken promises and guarantees, the Late Night host adds Trump’s recent backpedaling on the construction of his vaunted border wall. But if Trump fans like Rush Limbaugh are disappointed and distressed, they can take comfort in one vow he may fulfill: to cut taxes for corporations, adding some big special tax benefits for the wealthiest Americans, such as the abolition of the alternative minimum and estate taxes.

Now who could possibly benefit from that? Hint: Their name rhymes with dump, and they just adore that classy gold plating.

 

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Jeff Danziger lives in New York City. He is represented by CWS Syndicate and the Washington Post Writers Group. He is the recipient of the Herblock Prize and the Thomas Nast (Landau) Prize. He served in the US Army in Vietnam and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Air Medal. He has published eleven books of cartoons and one novel. Visit him at DanzigerCartoons.

The late Sen. John McCain

I don't know Kyrsten Sinema, but I did know John McCain. Not at all intimately, to be sure, but just enough to say -- despite her pretensions and the fantasies of her flacks that she is the reincarnation of the war hero in a purple wig -- that Kyrsten Sinema is no John McCain.

Lately Sinema has advertised herself as a "maverick," by which she means that she flouts the positions and policies of her party's leadership, and is supposed to pair her with McCain, who sometimes strayed from the Republican party line. Her most notorious attempt at imitation occurred last year with a gesture on the Senate floor marking her vote against a minimum wage increase. Her coy mimicry of the admired war hero was synthetic, leaving an unpleasant odor in its wake. When McCain delivered his bold "thumbs down" on gutting Obamacare, he was protecting Arizona's working families – not betraying them.

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