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Photo by Brian Turner licensed under CC BY 2.0

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Daniel Anderl, the 20-year old son of a federal judge was shot to death in his parents' New Jersey home by a gunman posing as a FedEx driver. U.S. District Court Judge Esther Salas' husband was also shot. Mark Anderl, 63, is in critical condition.

The New Jersey Globe also reports Judge Salas was not physically harmed.


"Preliminary indications are that the husband answered the door and was shot multiple times," NBC 4 New York reports, "the son came running to the door and was shot as well before the gunman fled, the sources said. Judge Salas was believed to be in the basement at the time of the shooting, and she was not injured."

The FBI is looking for information:

Judge Salas "was nominated by President Barack Obama," the AP reports, noting she "has presided over an ongoing lawsuit brought by Deutsche Bank investors who claim the company made false and misleading statements about its anti-money laundering policies and failed to monitor 'high-risk' customers including convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein."

On social media some legal experts warned against jumping to conclusions regarding the case.


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