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Tag: gallup poll

Gallup Finds GOP Image Tanking Fast — Due To Republican Defections

Reprinted with permission from Daily Kos

Americans' views of the Republican Party have taken a serious hit ever since the November election and the party's repeated efforts to overturn the election results, according to new polling from Gallup.

Just 37 percent of adults say they have a favorable view of the party, a precipitous six-point slide in just a few months from the 43 percent who viewed it positively in November. In the same period, the Democratic Party gained a few points in favorability, with 48 percent of respondents now viewing the party favorably. That gives Democrats what Gallup calls a "rare double-digit advantage in favorability."

But what is perhaps most striking is where the GOP is bleeding support from—its own ranks. "Since November, the GOP's image has suffered the most among Republican Party identifiers, from 90 percent favorable to 78 percent. Independents' and Democrats' opinions are essentially unchanged," according to Gallup. That image problem isn't merely theoretical; it has already resulted in tens of thousands of GOP defections across the country since November as conservative voters officially switch their party affiliations to something other than Republican.

On the flip side, Democrats' gain in favorability has come mostly from independents, whose positive views of party have increased by seven points since November, from 41 percent to 48 percent.

The GOP has "often" sunk into sub-40 territory, according to Gallup. When Donald Trump forced a lengthy government shutdown over his border wall in January 2019, for instance, GOP favorability fell to 38 percent. But news of the party's plummeting image comes right as GOP lawmakers rally around Trump—the main driver of their recent disfavored status—to prevent his conviction on impeachment charges.

Historically, the party that initiates impeachment proceedings takes a political hit. But Trump and his flagrant efforts to subvert the will of the people have proven to be historically unpopular, and Democrats are actually gaining in popularity due to their efforts to hold Trump accountable and safeguard American democracy.

Republicans, on the other hand, are sticking with Trump no matter the consequences because they simply can't imagine a world in which they have to appeal to anything beyond white identity to win elections.

Gallup Poll: Trump And Congressional Approval Ratings Plummet

Both President Donald Trump's and Congressional approval ratings have plummeted in the first half of December, according to a new Gallup poll.

Trump's approval rating has dipped to 39 percent, a 7 point decrease from the last Gallup survey, while Congressional satisfaction dropped 15%, the lowest rating for the 116th Congress, according to Gallup.

The president began December by ramping up political attacks while also increasing his threats to American democracy. His erratic behavior has even started to worry Trump's aides and his closest allies, leading to a "heated" Oval Office meeting with far-right conspiracists Michael Flynn and Sidney Powell. In that meeting Flynn proposed "martial law" to overturn the free and fair election that Joe Biden won by millions of votes.

Meanwhile, December was also a tumultuous month for Congress, as members bickered over a yearly defense spending bill (NDAA), a budget for FY 2021, and much needed COVID-19 relief. Late last night, right before a midnight deadline, Trump finally signed a joint bill which included COVID-19 relief and next year's budget. He also vetoed the defense bill, which Congress is expected to overturn.

Though American's moods are souring towards the current government, the Biden administration is receiving high marks for handling the transition. According to Gallup, nearly two-thirds of respondents reported they "approve" of Biden's actions during the transition.

New Polling Confirms Americans Welcome Immigrants More Than Ever

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Here's more of that other "Trump Effect" we've talked about before: new polling from Pew Research this week continues to confirm that Americans have only become more welcoming of immigrants and refugees since 2016 and Donald Trump's ensuing xenophobic presidency.

"In 2016 voters were about evenly divided in the share saying that the growing number of newcomers strengthens American society," Pew said, finding that 46 percent of all voters agreed with the statement. Four years later, that number has now surged to 60 percent. Americans "across the political spectrum have shifted in a more liberal direction in this domain," researchers said.

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Overwhelming Majority Of Americans Oppose Trump’s Transgender Troop Ban

No matter how you slice it, Americans hate Trump’s transgender troop ban.

A new poll from Gallup found that, except for Republicans, everyone surveyed backs the right of openly transgender troops to serve in the military.

Overall, 71 percent of people who were asked whether they favored or opposed allowing openly transgender men and women to serve in the military said they favored that right.

However, breaking down the data makes the breadth of the support even more evident. Among Democrats, 88 percent support transgender troops serving. The number is almost as high for people who consider themselves independents  — 78 percent.

Veterans favor allowing openly transgender people to serve by a substantial majority of 56 percent, while non-veterans clock in at 73 percent.

Women support transgender troop service more than men — 79 percent versus 64 percent — but both display solid support.

Finally, a majority of Americans across every age group also agree transgender people should be allowed to serve.

In fact, the only group surveyed where support for transgender troops didn’t break 50 percent was Republicans, but even there, a substantial portion — 43 percent — are in favor of their service.

And it isn’t just polls that reflect strong American support. National Guard leaders in five states are defying Trump’s ban and allowing openly transgender troops to serve. Former Defense Secretary Jim Mattis begged him to drop the ban. The American Medical Association said there was “no medically valid reason” for Trump’s ban.

All of this just shows how out of step Republicans are. They’re following Trump’s lead in pushing his hateful ban, and they’ve never stopped to consider if that is what their constituents actually want.

Instead, they’ve just tried to block the House from defunding enforcement of the ban. 182 Republicans voted against a Democratic measure that would have stopped the Pentagon from using federal funds to implement the ban.

Americans oppose Trump and they oppose his bigoted policies. The question is whether the Republicans who supposedly represent them will stop blindly following Trump and implement policies their constituents really want.

Published with permission of The American Independent.

 

Gallup Poll: Trump Doesn’t Have What It Takes To Be President

Trump is simply not presidential material. At least, that’s what a majority of Americans believe, according to a new Gallup poll released Tuesday.

The survey says 58 percent of Americans don’t think Trump has the “personality and leadership qualities a president should have.”

That’s far higher than the results for former Presidents Barack Obama and George W. Bush. According to Gallup, 40 percent of Americans didn’t believe Obama had the qualities to be president, while 35 percent of Americans didn’t believe Bush had the qualities to be commander in chief.

Gallup said that Trump’s character is one of his biggest weaknesses heading into the 2020 reelection campaign and that a focus on his personal qualities would hinder his chances at winning a second term.

“Democrats can enhance their odds of beating Trump in 2020 by nominating a candidate who is perceived as having a strong character,” Gallup wrote in an analysis of their poll.

So far, Trump has paid hush money to porn actresses that he had affairs with, stands accused of obstruction of justice in special counsel Robert Mueller’s report, sides with murderous dictators over American citizens, and whines and complains better than a misbehaved toddler.

That gives Democrats a lot of material to work with on the campaign trail.

Published with permission of The American Independent.

 

Worse Than George W. Bush! Poll Shows Plunging World Approval Of U.S. Leadership

Earlier this week, based on a survey of nearly 2000 participants, Politico and Morning Consult found more than a third of Americans would give Donald Trump a failing grade for his first year in office. Poll respondents were especially disgusted with his handling of climate change and foreign relations, among other policy matters. Judging from the Rating World Leaders: 2018 report published Thursday, the rest of the world feels much the same way.

According to Gallup, the median approval rating of U.S. leadership abroad has slid from 48 to 30 percent since Trump took office. That’s four points lower than President George W. Bush’s mark of 34 percent in 2008, five years after he launched the disastrous invasion of Iraq. Similarly, disapproval of the U.S. president has soared from 28 to 43 percent over the same time period.

“The recent drop in approval ratings is unrelated to the world’s being less familiar with the new U.S. administration,” Gallup notes. “The global median who do not have an opinion about U.S. leadership in 2017 (23 percent) is similar to the 25 percent in the last year of the Obama presidency.”

Polling data reveal the U.S. has seen its biggest losses in Portugal, Belgium, Norway and Canada, each experiencing a drop in approval rating of at least 40 percent. President Trump has proven especially unpopular in the Americas, where disapproval of U.S. leadership has climbed from 27 to 58 percent since President Barack Obama’s final year in office. Perhaps unsurprisingly, Trump fared well in Israel, where he enjoys an approval rating of 67 percent—approximately the same mark the U.S. ally gave the second Bush administration.

“The losses in U.S. leadership approval may have implications on U.S. influence abroad,” the poll report continues. “With its stable approval rating of 41 percent, Germany has replaced the U.S. as the top-rated global power in the world. The U.S. is now on nearly even footing with China (31 percent) and barely more popular than Russia (27 percent)—two countries that Trump sees as rivals seeking to “challenge American influence, values and wealth.”

Gallup observes that the findings mark a “return to the status quo” under George W. Bush’s second term. Whether the U.S. will be able to regain the world’s trust, as it largely did under President Obama, remains to be seen.

Read Gallup’s complete findings.

Jacob Sugarman is a managing editor at AlterNet.

Average Full-Time Workweek Is 47 Hours, Gallup Says

By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times

Full-time American workers labor the equivalent of nearly an additional day each week, averaging 47 hours instead of the standard 40, according to Gallup poll results released Friday.

Just 42 percent of full-time employees work 40 hours a week, the traditional total based on five 9 a.m.-to-5 p.m. workdays, Gallup said of findings it released ahead of the Labor Day weekend.

Nearly the same percentage — 39 percent — say they work at least 50 hours a week. And almost one in five Americans, or 18 percent, said their workweek stretched 60 hours or more.

“The 40-hour workweek is widely regarded as the standard for full-time employment, and many federal employment laws — including the Affordable Care Act, or ‘Obamacare’ — use this threshold to define what a full-time employee is,” Gallup said.

“However, barely four in 10 full-time workers in the U.S. indicate they work precisely this much,” Gallup said.

Salaried employees work an average of 49 hours a week, compared with 44 hours for people paid by the hour. A quarter of salaried workers said they spend 60 or more hours a week on the job.

The overall 47-hour average workweek has held roughly steady for 14 years, Gallup said.

But the percentage of workers with full-time employment now is 43 percent, down from about 50 percent before the Great Recession.

Part-timers are about 9 percent of the adult population, also consistent with poll results over the past 14 years, Gallup said.

The results are based on surveys of 1,271 adults in Gallup’s 2013 and 2014 Work and Education Survey.

AFP Photo/Justin Sullivan

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Risk Of Depression Is Nearly Twice As High For Unemployed Americans

By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times

Unemployment takes a significant toll on the mental health of workers, especially those who have been out of their jobs for at least 27 weeks — what the Bureau of Labor Statistics considers the “long-term unemployed.”

The longer a person has been out of work, the greater the chances that he or she will develop a clinical case of depression, according to data from a new Gallup poll. Among Americans who have been without a job for three to five weeks, 10 percent said they were depressed or were being treated for depression. That figure rose to 17 percent for those who have been out of work for six months to one year. Among people who have crossed the one-year mark, 19 percent were battling depression, the poll found.

Overall, unemployed Americans were nearly twice as likely as working Americans to be depressed — 12.4 percent versus 6.4 percent, according to Gallup.

The poll found that 5.6 percent of people with full-time jobs said they were depressed or were being treated for depression. They were joined by 8 percent of people who worked part time and weren’t seeking full-time jobs. Among those stuck with part-time gigs because they couldn’t find full-time work, 10.3 percent said they were depressed.

But the situation was worse for people without any work at all. The survey found that 12.3 percent of the short-term unemployed (who had been jobless for fewer than 27 weeks) were depressed, as were 18 percent of the long-term unemployed.

Those feelings may help explain why people become increasingly pessimistic about their prospects for finding a job the longer they’ve been out of work. Among people who have been unemployed for five weeks or fewer, about 70 percent think they’ll get a job in the next four weeks. But among people who have been unemployed for at least a year, only 30 percent believe a job offer will come their way in the next four weeks, the poll found.

It’s not hard to see how being unemployed could lead to depression. But the Gallup report notes that the reverse may be true as well — that people who are depressed could have more trouble finding a new job.

Either way, the poll results could be useful to those who design programs aimed at helping Americans get back to work by highlighting the need for taking their psychological and social well-being into account, according to the report.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics says 9.8 million Americans were out of work in May, including 3.4 million who were considered long-term unemployed.

The data are based on interviews with 356,599 Americans who were surveyed in 2013 for the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index. That sample included 18,322 who were unemployed at the time of their interview. The poll results were published Monday.

Photo: .v1ctor Casale via Flickr