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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

“This Week In Health” offers some highlights from the world of health news and wellness tips that you may have missed this week:

  • Scientists are warning that an everyday habit of popping nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as aspirin and ibuprofen, has been linked to a higher risk of heart failure. The FDA is moving forward with plans to include additional language on the labels of these largely over-the-counter medications to alert users to the increased risk. (Prescription NSAIDs have come with warnings since 2005.)
  • It’s just a bad week for NSAIDs. Additional research indicates that mixing the OTC painkillers with antidepressants correlates to a higher risk of intercranial bleeding. (Insert usual caveats about how “additional research is needed” and that whole correlation/causation thing — but this is bleeding under the skull we’re talking about here.)
  • So far this year, West Nile Virus has been detected in North Dakota, Illinois, and at least 20 other states. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 in 5 of those infected will have fevers, body pain, headaches, rashes, vomiting, and diarrhea. There’s no way to treat the mosquito-carried virus, so the CDC recommends wearing long sleeves and using bug repellant. Or you can just stay indoors all summer.
  • Well, if you happen to be a person who eats food, watch out. In a few short days, salmonella infections were reported in Minnesota, Idaho and Wisconsin, leading to over 1.7 million pounds of chicken being recalled — which should be a huge comfort to those who were infected from eating tuna.

Photo: Ryan Seyeau via Flickr

Trump lawyer Rudy Giuliani

Photo by Gage Skidmore/ CC BY-SA 2.0

Reprinted with permission from MediaMatters

If you blinked, you might have missed the turn in the national spotlight of Tony Bobulinski, a disgruntled former business partner of Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden's son, Hunter Biden. Bobulinski's claims of corruption by Joe Biden were promoted by President Donald Trump and his campaign, then debunked within hours. But the affair shows why journalists should be wary of the information control strategy that Trump's allies are using to smear the former vice president through his son's business interests.

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