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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

“This Week In Health” offers some highlights from the world of health news that you may have missed this week:

One Third Of Diabetes In The U.S. Is Undiagnosed: Diabetes affects up to 14 percent of the U.S. population – an increase from nearly 10 percent in the early 1990s – yet over a third of cases still go undiagnosed, according to a new analysis. Screening seems to be catching more cases, accounting for the general rise over two decades, the study authors say, but mainly whites have benefited; for Hispanic and Asian people in particular, more than half of cases go undetected.

Independent Group Finds New Cholesterol Drugs Far Too Costly: An independent non-profit organization that evaluates clinical and cost effectiveness of new medicines said announced prices for a just-approved class of potent cholesterol lowering drugs were far too high, according to a draft report released on Tuesday.

Less Invasive Heart Valve Surgery Safe For Patients In Their 90s: A modern technique for replacing heart valves without major surgery is safe even for very elderly patients, researchers say. The procedure can yield “excellent short- and mid-term outcomes in a patient population with a lethal disease that without this technology would undoubtedly die,” according to Dr. Vinod H. Thourani from Emory University.

Image: Jo Christian Oterhals via Flickr

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Screenshot Youtube

Just over year before her untimely death on Friday, the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg appeared as a guest lecturer for the Clinton School of Public Service in Little Rock, AR with National Public Radio correspondent Nina Totenberg. The crowd that signed up to see "Notorious RBG" live was so large that the event had to be moved to a major sports arena – and they weren't disappointed by the wide-ranging, hour-long interview.

Witty, charming, brilliant, principled, Ginsburg represented the very best of American liberalism and modern feminism. Listen to her and you'll feel even more deeply what former President Bill Clinton says in his poignant introduction: "Only one of us in this room appointed her…but all of us hope that she will stay on that court forever."