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Reprinted with permission from Alternet.

In perhaps the most dramatic example this cycle of the force of progressive politics, high-ranking Democratic Rep. Joe Crowley (D-NY) lost his primary race Tuesday night to the upstart Democratic Socialist candidate Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

The 28-year-old Ocasio-Cortez had been recognized as a strong candidate, but the conventional wisdom still favored Crowley, a longtime Queens lawmaker and the county’s part chair.

“This is shocking,” said New York Times reporter Maggie Haberman. Referring to the upcoming New York governor’s race, she said the upset “will leave Cuomo, who was already sweating Nixon, rattled.”

“It’s clearly a signal that people want to get rid of the old and put in the new,” a Democratic lawmaker told Manu Raju.

Given Crowley’s place in the Democratic leadership, many compared the defeat to former GOP Rep. Eric Cantor of Virginia, who lost his seat as House Majority Whip in 2014 to a primary opponent.

“The Cantor comparison is obvious, but this is actually a much bigger deal than that…” said Vox reporter Matt Yglesias. “Ideology-driven defeats of Democratic incumbents are *incredibly* rare in a way that wasn’t true for Republicans when Cantor went down.”

Ocasio-Cortez’ positions were significantly to the left of her opponent. She endorsed a swath of progressive ambitions, including Medicare-for-All, establishing housing as a human right, abolishing Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), restoring the Glass-Steagall Act, and overhauling campaign finance laws.

IMAGE: Primary challenger Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez at the moment of victory as she defeated incumbent Rep. Joe Crowley (D-NY), a top House Democratic leader, on June 26.

 

President Trump boards Air Force One for his return flight home from Florida on July 31, 2020

Official White House Photo by Joyce N. Boghosian

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

Florida senior residents have been reliable Republican voters for decades, but it looks like their political impact could shift in the upcoming 2020 election.

As Election Day approaches, Florida is becoming a major focal point. President Donald Trump is facing more of an uphill battle with maintaining the support of senior voters due to his handling of critical issues over the last several months. Several seniors, including some who voted for Trump in 2016, have explained why he will not receive their support in the November election.

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