The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Reprinted with permission from Shareblue.

 

The “Trump Baby” blimp is coming to New Jersey to haunt Trump when he spends weekends relaxing at one of his properties.

During his recent trip to England, Trump said the presence of the blimp, which depicts him as a diaper-wearing baby yelling into a cell phone, made him feel “unwelcome” in London.

He avoided capital city, where thousands marched alongside the Trump blimp to protest his toxic racism and vile personal character.

Now Trump might feel “unwelcome” at his own club in Bedminster, New Jersey, where he often spends weekends during the summer.

Activists in New Jersey set up an online fundraiser to build a replica “Trump Baby” blimp. They asked for $4,500 and have now raised over $23,693 in an ongoing testament to Trump’s unpopularity and the strong resistance to his presidency.

Activists Didier Jiminez-Castro and Jim Girvan told NPR they will use the surplus to buy multiple blimps “so we can go coast-to-coast, border-to-border.”

The first deployment stateside will be at Trump’s National Golf Club in Bedminster.

“The baby Trump is not just a piece of humor, but it is also a symbol of the administration,” Jiminez-Castro said. “It’s symbolic of the children that are in cages, it’s a symbol of racism, and we know that he hates to be ridiculed.”

The deployment of the blimp on American soil will demonstrate that despite Trump’s attempts to disrupt the historic friendship between the United Kingdom and America, the “special relationship” continues.

Shaming, mocking, and ridiculing Trump is an activity that extends across the Atlantic Ocean, uniting those who oppose hate and bigotry.

Trump Baby is coming.

Published with permission of The American Independent.

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

U.S. SUPREME COURT

YouTube Screenshot

In the aftermath of the Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v Wade, ending the constitutional right to an abortion after almost 50 years, some conservatives and mainstream media outlets have suggested that anti-abortionists may be willing to support more generous family welfare programs to offset the financial burden of forced birth. These suggestions, whether made in bad faith or ignorance, completely misunderstand the social function of prohibiting abortion, which is to exert control over women and all people who can get pregnant.

In adopting or replicating the right’s framing of anti-abortionists as “pro-life,” these outlets mystify the conservative movement’s history and current goals. Conservatives have sought to dismantle the United State’s limited safety net since the passage of the New Deal. Expecting the movement to reverse course now is absurd, and suggesting so serves primarily to obfuscate the economic hardship the end of Roe will inflict on people forced to carry a pregnancy to term.

Keep reading... Show less

Arizona Republican Senate candidate Blake Masters

YouTube Screenshot

Donald Trump's hand-picked candidate Blake Masters is the latest to endorse the unpopular idea.

The front-runner in the GOP primary to run for Senate in Arizona in November against Democratic incumbent Sen. Mark Kelly suggested on June 23 that Social Security should be privatized, an approach to the popular government program that experts say could jeopardize a vital financial lifeline for retired Americans.

Keep reading... Show less
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}