The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Reprinted with permission from AlterNet.

 

With Democrats now taking over the House, and new revelations from the prosecutions of President Donald Trump’s inner circle coming out by the day, talk is inevitably turning toward the possibility the president could be impeached before his term is out.

But Trump himself insists he’s not worried about that in a new interview with Reuters in the Oval Office.

“It’s hard to impeach somebody who hasn’t done anything wrong and who’s created the greatest economy in the history of our country,” Trump said. “I’m not concerned, no. I think that the people would revolt if that happened,” he said.

This notion of a pro-Trump “revolt” in the event of impeachment is a common theme among the president’s allies. In August, Trump’s lawyer Rudy Giuliani used the exact same words.

But how likely is such a “revolt”? If polls are any indication, not likely at all. Survey after survey after survey has shown that more Americans want Trump impeached than approve of the job he’s doing.

It may well be the case that the decent economy is keeping Trump’s numbers from cratering. But even there, this is hardly the “greatest economy ever,” and in any case the economy isn’t growing faster than it was under President Barack Obama.

Regardless of whether a revolt is likely to happen, it is utterly irresponsible for a president to longingly speculate about civil unrest in the event that a lawful process removes him from power. But gleefully imagining violence is one of Trump’s signature moves, from telling his supporters he’d pay the legal fees if they “knock the crap” out of protestors, to his suggesting that his opponent might be shot by gun rights supporters.

And as for Trump’s claim that he “hasn’t done anything wrong,” prosecutors with the Southern District of New York would strenuously disagree, as they have all but laid out that he directed his former attorney to commit a campaign finance felony to pay off women he slept with — which incoming House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) believes could amount to impeachable offenses. When asked about these payments by Reuters, Trump insisted that “there was no violation based on what we did,” and then rounded off by saying, “Hillary Clinton — her husband got money, she got money, she paid money, why doesn’t somebody talk about that?”

Whether or not this misbehavior brings down Trump, his belief that the American people would have his back in impeachment proceedings is likely misplaced. And he should hope that belief is never put to the test.

Matthew Chapman is a video game designer, science fiction author, and political reporter from Austin, TX. Follow him on Twitter @fawfulfan.

 

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Immigrants crossing from Mexico into the United States

Youtube Screenshot

America needs more immigrants, but we seem determined to shoot ourselves in the foot. Before addressing that self-sabotage, permit a small digression.

Keep reading... Show less

Eric Herschmann

The fight over how to deal with the classified documents that Donald Trump stole from the White House and hid away in Mar-a-Lago is continuing with rulings both from the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals and in the courtroom of “special master” Judge Raymond Dearie. In the past two days, both of those locations have handed Trump’s team of second-rate lawyers major defeats, with a stay that allows the Department of Justice to continue a criminal investigation, and a ruling that Trump’s vague claims about “declassification” are off the table.

Keep reading... Show less
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}