The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

WASHINGTON (Reuters) — Donald Trump’s presidential campaign warned the Republican Party on Tuesday about donors pooling funds for attack ads, saying Republicans must treat him fairly if they want to keep him from launching an independent bid.

Trump lawyer Michael Cohen told CNN that if Republican donors backing different presidential candidates come together for an anti-Trump advertising campaign, it would be a “bad, bad decision.”

The Super PAC planning the attack is New Day for America, which is supporting Ohio Governor John Kasich’s presidential bid. Its spokesman, Matt David, said on Sunday that 10 new donors had pledged money since Thursday when Politico reported the group’s plans to attack Trump in New Hampshire.

Trump signed a pledge to run as a Republican in the 2016 presidential election, but Cohen indicated the agreement would be invalid if Republicans target the billionaire real estate mogul.

“If they treat him fairly, he will honor the pledge because he’s an honorable guy. If they break that agreement with him, as they say ‘woe be on them,'” Cohen told CNN.

The Republican National Committee said it had no role in Super PAC decisions and would remain neutral in the presidential nominating process.

“For any attorney to suggest the RNC can control how, or who supports or opposes particular candidates shows a basic misunderstanding of politics, free speech and the law,” RNC spokeswoman Allison Moore said in an email.Cohen dismissed that point and insisted RNC Chairman Reince Priebus has an obligation to see that Trump is treated fairly.

“If they don’t, this will be a very, very bad thing for the Republican Party,” Cohen said.

Trump is leading in polls of Republican primary voters both nationwide and in early voting states like Iowa and New Hampshire. His numbers have risen despite criticism about his business record and backlash from his contentious statements about immigrants and Muslims, among other things.

(Reporting by Doina Chiacu; Editing by Jeffrey Benkoe and Christian Plumb)

Photo: U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump signs autographs for supporters at a rally in Columbus, Ohio, November 23, 2015. REUTERS/Jay LaPrete

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Youtube Screenshot

Executing a valid search warrant, FBI agents arrived in the morning to search the office. The word "unprecedented" was on everyone's lips. They seized business records, computers and other documents related to possible crimes. An enraged Donald Trump denounced the FBI and the Justice Department, saying not that they had abided by the warrant issued by a federal judge, but rather that agents had "broken into" the office.

The year was 2018, and Trump was livid about the FBI's investigation into his longtime attorney/fixer, Michael Cohen.

Keep reading... Show less

Donald Trump

Youtube Screenshot

In the days since the FBI executed a search warrant at Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago home, Trump, and his GOP lackeys have trotted out excuse after excuse to explain away the trove of material seized from a storage room at his golf club: A politically motivated witch hunt! The evidence was planted by the FBI! There was nothing important there! Obama did it too! (He didn’t.) And finally, on Friday night:


Keep reading... Show less
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}