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Trump told reporters that he would not allow the CIA to use North Korea dictator Kim Jung Un’s family as informants. The comments came on Tuesday afternoon as Trump prepared to leave for an event in Iowa.

“I saw the information about the CIA with respect to his brother or half-brother, and I would tell him that would not happen under my… under my auspices. That’s for sure. I wouldn’t let that happen under my auspices,” Trump said.

In his remarks, Trump was referring to reports that Kim’s half-brother, Kim Jong Nan, was a CIA informant before he was murdered in 2017, allegedly under orders from the North Korean government.

Trump seemed to be influenced by a recent letter from Kim.

“I just received a beautiful letter from Kim Jong Un, and I think the relationship is well,” Trump said. He reiterated the letter later in his remarks, calling it “very personal, very warm, very nice letter.”

Trump’s promise to prevent a U.S. intelligence agency from doing its job surprised at lease one U.S. senator.

“Whaaaaaat?” was the only comment from Sen. Brian Schatz (D-HI).

Trump has a long history of siding with the murderous North Korean dictator. Even earlier this month, Trump defended Kim after Kim allegedly murdered one of his own top government officials.

Last month, Trump’s own officials were forced to correct him after North Korea violated sanctions by testing missiles. Trump brushed it off as no big deal.

In the past, Trump threw U.S. intelligence agencies under the bus to appease Russian dictator Vladimir Putin. Now he is doing it to appease a North Korean dictator.

At some point, maybe Trump could focus on siding with Americans over dictators.

Published with permission of The American Independent.

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