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WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump used a vulgarity to describe Hillary Clinton’s loss to Barack Obama for the 2008 Democratic presidential nomination and then poked fun at her taking a bathroom break during a debate.

Trump’s off-color comments about the Democratic front-runner at a campaign appearance on Monday night came a day after he called Clinton a liar for saying his proposal to ban entry of all foreign Muslims to the United States has aided Islamic State’s propaganda efforts.

“She was going to beat Obama,” Trump said of Clinton in Grand Rapids, Michigan. “… She was going to beat – she was favored to win – and she got schlonged. She lost. She lost.”

“Schlong” is a Yiddish slang term for a man’s genitals.

Trump, who is leading the Republican field for the 2016 presidential nomination, also made a reference to Clinton returning to the stage late after a bathroom break during a Democratic debate on Saturday night.

“I thought she gave up,” Trump said. “Where did she go? Where did Hillary go? They had to start the debate without her. Phase II. I know where she went. It’s disgusting. I don’t want to talk about it,” Trump said.

Trump’s appearance was interrupted by hecklers who were ejected from the event. The real estate tycoon suggested the protesters might be “drugged out” and chided another group for being “so weak” they would not resist security guards’ directions to leave.

Trump’s blunt style and comments about Hispanics, women, Muslims and his rivals for the nomination have set much of the tone for the Republican race. His comments about Clinton were not the first time he has veered into vulgarity during the campaign. After a prime-time televised debate in August, he posted Twitter messages criticizing Fox News moderator Megyn Kelly and then made comments in a television interview that were widely interpreted as referring to her menstrual cycle. He denied that was his intention.

(Writing by Doina Chiacu; Editing by Bill Trott)

U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump addresses the crowd during a campaign rally in Grand Rapids, Michigan December 21, 2015.     REUTERS/Rebecca Cook 

Blake Neff

Twitter screenshot

Reprinted with permission from MediaMatters

On July 10, CNN's Oliver Darcy reported that Blake Neff, the top writer for Tucker Carlson's prime-time Fox News show, had been anonymously posting racist, misogynistic, homophobic, and other offensive content on an online forum for five years. Neff used racist and homophobic slurs, referred to women in a derogatory manner, and pushed white supremacist content while writing for Carlson's show. Neff resigned after CNN contacted him for comment.

As Darcy reported, in an interview with the Dartmouth Alumni Magazine, Neff claimed anything Carlson read during his show was initially drafted by him. Darcy also found instances where there was "some overlap between the forum and the show," as sometimes the "material Neff encountered on the forum found its way on to Carlson's show."

During a 2018 appearance on Fox's The Five to promote his book Ship of Fools, Carlson mentioned Neff by name, calling him a "wonderful writer." Carlson also included Neff in the acknowledgments of the book.


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Before joining Fox News, Neff worked at The Daily Caller, a conservative news outlet that Carlson co-founded. The outlet has published a number of white supremacists, anti-Semites, and bigots.


Carlson has a long history of promoting white supremacist content on his show. His show has featured many guests who have connections to white supremacy and far-right extremism. Carlson has regularly been praised by Neo-Nazis and various far-right extremist figures, and he's been a hero on many white supremacist podcasts. Users of the extremist online message boards 4chan and 8chan have repeatedly praised Carlson.

The manifesto released by the gunman who killed 20 people in El Paso, Texas, in 2019 was strewn with content that echoed talking points from Carlson's show. Days after the shooting, Carlson declared that calling white supremacy a serious issue is a "hoax" as it is "actually not a real problem in America."

Carlson has been hemorrhaging advertisers following his racist coverage of the Black Lives Matters movement and the recent protests against police brutality. Now that we know his top writer was using content from white supremacist online message boards for Carlson's show, it is more imperative than ever that advertisers distance their brands away from this toxicity.