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A U.S. appeals court on Tuesday upheld the Federal Communications Commission’s landmark net neutrality rules, a big boost to the Obama administration and a blow to internet service providers in a ruling that could determine how consumers access content on the Internet.

A three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit ruled for the Obama administration on a 2-1 vote. The decision came in the latest battle over administration rules requiring broadband providers to treat all data equally, rather than giving or selling access to a so-called Web fast lane.

The ruling handed a major victory to the Obama administration, which had urged the FCC to approve sweeping rules in 2015, and boosts the FCC in its bid to complete action on several major rules before the end of the year.

So-called net neutrality is a major issue for broadband providers like Verizon Communications Inc and Comcast Corp , which fear the rules may make it harder to manage Internet traffic and make investment to provide additional capacity less likely. It is also a big concern for content providers like Netflix Inc and Yelp Inc worried that access to customers could be limited without net neutrality.

An internet cable is seen at a server room in this picture illustration taken in Warsaw January 24, 2012. REUTERS/Kacper Pempel

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Mar-A-Lago

Youtube Screenshot

Federal Magistrate Judge Bruce Reinhart of the Southern District of Florida on Thursday ordered the partial unsealing of the affidavit that the United States Department of Justice used to obtain and execute a search warrant at former President Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach last Monday.

“On my initial careful review ... there are portions of it that can be unsealed,” Reinhart said as reported by NBC News.

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QAnon flag

Reprinted with permission from American Independent

When Democratic now-President Joe Biden won the 2020 presidential election — defeating Republican then-President Donald Trump by more than seven million in the popular vote and picking up 306 electoral votes — critics of QAnon hoped that the far-right conspiracy movement would go away. But that didn’t happen. Just as Trump himself has maintained a level of influence that is unusual for ex-presidents, QAnon is still going strong almost 19 months into Biden’s presidency. Moreover, the extremist movement, according to New Republic reporter Melissa Gira Grant, is making a concerted effort to increase its influence via the 2022 midterms.

“A movement we were told would collapse without (Trump) has gone mainstream in Republican politics, and now boasts the support of more than 20 candidates running for federal or statewide office who will appear on the ballot this November,” Grant reports in an article published by The New Republic on August 18. “As many as 18 QAnon-supporting candidates for Congress will compete in November’s general election, with two QAnon-supporting gubernatorial candidates and two QAnon-supporting candidates for secretary of state, based on analyses from Grid and Media Matters. Including people who lost their primaries, QAnon candidates made the ballot in 26 states in the 2022 elections, and they have raised more than $20 million.”

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