The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

New York (AFP) – Ford Motor Thursday announced that Alan Mulally will step down as chief executive on July 1, and named chief operating officer Mark Fields to replace him.

The announcement moves up by six months the time-frame for the departure of Mulally, 68, a former Boeing executive credited with turning the company around.

“Alan and I feel strongly that Mark and the entire leadership team are absolutely ready to lead Ford forward, and now is the time to begin the transition,” executive chairman Bill Ford, who recruited Mulally from Boeing in 2006 said in a statement.

“Alan deservedly will be long remembered for engineering one of the most successful business turnarounds in history,” Bill Ford said.

In November 2012, Ford announced the promotion of Fields, 53, formerly president of the company’s Americas division, as chief operating officer, tasked with managing business operations.

Meanwhile CEO Mulally oversaw strategic development, and Ford at the time said he was expected to remain in that job “through at least 2014.”

The U.S.’s second-largest automaker notched impressive sales growth under Mulally, who also enabled the Detroit to withstand the 2008 financial crisis without seeking a government bailout. Earnings rose 26.3 percent in 2013 to $7.2 billion.

In late 2013 and early 2014, Mulally was frequently mentioned as a candidate to lead Microsoft, but the software giant ultimately turned inward for a new CEO, choosing Satya Nadella.

Ford shares were up 0.4 percent to $16.06 in pre-market trade.

Stan Honda AFP

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

President Joe Biden

The price of gasoline is not Joe Biden's fault, nor did it break records. Adjusted for inflation, it was higher in 2008 when Republican George W. Bush was president. And that wasn't Bush's fault, either.

We don't have to like today's inflation, but that problem, too, is not Biden's doing. Republicans are nonetheless hot to pin the rap on him. Rising prices, mostly tied to oil, have numerous causes. There would be greater supply of oil and gas, they say, if Biden were more open to approving pipelines and more drilling on public land.

Keep reading... Show less
Youtube Screenshot

Heat deaths in the U.S. peak in July and August, and as that period kicks off, a new report from Public Citizen highlights heat as a major workplace safety issue. With basically every year breaking heat records thanks to climate change, this is only going to get worse without significant action to protect workers from injury and death.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration admits that government data on heat-related injury, illness, and death on the job are “likely vast underestimates.” Those vast underestimates are “about 3,400 workplace heat-related injuries and illnesses requiring days away from work per year from 2011 to 2020” and an average of 40 fatalities a year. Looking deeper, Public Citizen found, “An analysis of more than 11 million workers’ compensation injury reports in California from 2001 through 2018 found that working on days with hotter temperatures likely caused about 20,000 injuries and illnesses per year in that state, alone—an extraordinary 300 times the annual number injuries and illnesses that California OSHA (Cal/OSHA) attributes to heat.”

Keep reading... Show less
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}