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Reprinted with permission from AlterNet.

 

Just a few hours after the White House publicly defended President Donald Trump’s nomination of Ronny Jackson to become secretary of Veterans Affairs, the New York Times reported new details about the allegations against the rear admiral that threaten to sink the possibility of his appointment.

Most strikingly, the report says that Jackson provided a “large supply” of the opioid Percoset to a White House military office staffer. This prescription reportedly panicked Jackson’s staff, according to a summary of allegations provided by Democratic senators on the Veterans Affairs committee.

Jackson also once crashed a government vehicle while intoxicated, according to the report.

The senators’ summary of charges against Jackson, which also include creating a hostile work environment and berating staff, comes from the testimony of 23 people familiar with Jackson, many of whom are currently serving in the military.

“He’s an admiral, he’s a great leader, and they question him for every little thing,” Trump said of Jackson Tuesday while defending his nominee, even after some of the allegations against him emerged. But Trump also left the door open for Jackson to bow out of consideration, saying he wouldn’t continue with a brutal appointment process in the admiral’s place.

Cody Fenwick is a reporter and editor. Follow him on Twitter @codytfenwick.

Photo by archer10 (Dennis) / CC BY-SA 2.0

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