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National Memo Editor-in-Chief Joe Conason serves as the moderator for “Tiny Pundits,” a new web feature from Punch! — a free iPad based humor magazine — in which three pundits fiercely debate political talking points.

The catch? These pundits don’t just act like little kids — they’re actually eight years old.

As Politico’s Alexander Burns explains:

The “Tiny Pundits” video features the non-fictional Joe Conason moderating a debate between three elementary school-age girls on topics such as, say, President Obama’s likability.

“This whole likable thing is a non-issue,” says Alexandra Lee, the supposed Rick Santorum adviser. “Voters want someone who can manage the economy.”

Jillian Corker of the fictional (I think) Boswell Institute, responds: “This whole idea of Romney as a job creator makes me laugh. This is a man who likes to fire people.” Lee cuts in: “Only someone who doesn’t understand business would say that. That’s really, really dumb.”

Comedy Central’s Indecsion blog suggests that “that one little girl on the right might just be the answer to the GOP’s recent Jonathan Krohn problem.” At the very least, the Tiny Pundits could hardly do more damage than some of the actual pundits who have tried to “help” their favored candidates.

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