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Kris Perry and Sandy Stier were being interviewed about the Supreme Court’s decision to let California’s Proposition 8 stand as unconstitutional when suddenly they got a phone call.

“We’re proud of you guys, and we’re so glad,” President Obama said via speakerphone.

Jeff Zarrillo and Paul Katami, the two other plaintiffs in the case challenging Prop 8, rushed to Human Rights Campaign president Chad Griffin’s cellphone to listen to the president speak.

They all thanked President Obama and Griffin said we needed to “roll our sleeves up” and get to work for the 37 states that still don’t have marriage equality.

Paul Katami told the president, “You’re invited to the wedding.”

President Obama has “evolved” on same-sex marriage from only supporting civil unions to believing there’s an equal-protection argument for same-sex marriage in the Constitution. He explained his rationale last year.

He went on to become the first president to mention gay rights in an inaugural address.

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