The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Senator Angus King (I-ME) sharply criticized Dick Cheney on Sunday, offering to waterboard the former vice president if he truly doesn’t believe that the “enhanced interrogation technique” is torture.

King was set off by Cheney’s recent remarks that waterboarding — a practice in which water is poured over an immobilized inmate’s face to simulate drowning — “wasn’t torture.”

“If I would have to do it all over again, I would,” Cheney said at American University on March 28. “The results speak for themselves.”

Citing a recent report by the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence (on which he serves), King ripped Cheney’s claim.

“I sat and re-read the entire report last week,” King told MSNBC’s Steve Kornacki. “It’s shocking.”

“And frankly, I was stunned to hear that quote from Vice President Cheney just now,” King continued. “If he doesn’t think that was torture, I would invite him anywhere in the United States to sit in a waterboard and go through what those people went through, one of them a hundred and plus-odd times.”

“That’s ridiculous to make that claim. This was torture by anybody’s definition,” the senator added. “John McCain said it’s torture, and I think he’s in a better position to know that than Vice President Cheney. I was shocked to hear that statement that he just made. And to say that it was carefully managed, and everybody knew what was going on, that’s absolutely nonsense.”

King, an Independent who caucuses with the Democratic majority, has never been one to mince words. In September, he memorably insisted that the Koch brothers and others who persuade Americans to opt out of health coverage “are guilty of murder.”

Photo: Gage Skidmore via Flickr

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Attorney General Merrick Garland

Photo by The White House

Reprinted with permission from Daily Kos

The Department of Justice had the kind of pro-police reform week that doesn't happen every year. In a seven-day period, Attorney General Merrick Garland announced a ban on chokeholds and no-knock warrants, an overhaul on how to handle law enforcement oversight deals, and a promise to make sure the Justice Department wasn't funding agencies that engage in racial discrimination.

Keep reading... Show less

FBI Director Faces Sharp New Scrutiny Over Kavanaugh Probe

Photo by Federal Bureau of Investigation (Public domain)

Reprinted with permission from Alternet

When then-U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh was accused of sexual misconduct by Christine Blasey Ford — a psychology professor at Palo Alto University — in 2018, the FBI conducted an investigation. But Kavanaugh's critics argued that the investigation should have been much more comprehensive in light of the fact that then-President Donald Trump had nominated him for a lifetime appointment on the highest judicial body in the United States. FBI Director Christopher Wray's handling of that investigation, according to Guardian reporter Stephanie Kirchgaessner, continues to be scrutinized three years later.

Keep reading... Show less
x
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}