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“Of all the Kochs’ investments in right-wing organizations, ALEC provides some of the best returns: It gives the Kochs a way to make their brand of free-market fundamentalism legally binding,” The Nation‘s Lisa Graves reported in 2011.

But until the killing of Trayvon Martin in 2012 cast some light on ALEC-backed “Stand Your Ground” laws, very few Americans had ever heard of this shadowy organization that brings together corporate lobbyists with corporate politicians to pass corporate laws that benefit corporations at the expense of the public.

You probably didn’t hear — for instance — that ALEC held its super-secretive annual meeting last weekend in Oklahoma City, while the NRA, an ALEC affiliate, attracted most of the media’s attention.

This video above illuminates how ALEC’s tentacles stretch into all 50 states, passing laws that make it easier for corporations to abuse animals, monetize public education and pollute the planet.

What is the left-wing version of ALEC, fighting on behalf of workers and preserving public resources? Generally, it has been organized labor. But union membership is lower than it has been since the 1930s, thanks in some part to ALEC.

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Roger Stone, left, and Alex Jones

Photo by Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call

Scene 1:

The study at the Bedminster Golf Club. Donald Trump is meeting with a visitor, his former international trade advisor and January 6th co-conspirator, Peter Navarro.

TRUMP: Jared’s memoir? No, not going to read it, Peter. Nope, not a snowball’s chance in Hell’s Kitchen.

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Albert Woodfox passed away on August 4, 2022. In what’s believed to be the record for the longest stint in solitary in American history, Woodfox spent approximately 43 years alone in a 6-by-9-foot cell in the Louisiana State Penitentiary, colloquially called Angola, the name of the plantation that once occupied the same land.

The circumstances of his incarceration are as mind-boggling as the length of time Woodfox languished in loneliness. Along with an inmate named Herman Wallace, Woodfox was falsely accused — and wrongly convicted twice — of killing a corrections officer. Woodfox, Wallace, and another inmate were known for their indefinite placement in segregation and were dubbed the “Angola 3.”

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