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The 2016 presidential election may be more than three years away, but some Republicans have already organized an effort to block the top contender from ever reaching the White House.

Stop Hillary PAC, a political action committee led by right-wing Colorado state senator Ted Harvey — best known for his efforts to allow concealed weapons in schools — warns on its website that “Hillary Clinton is the liberal standard-bearer of the next generation of liberal creep on our Constitutional rights.” Its solution? To “stop Hillary Clinton now, together, before it’s too late. Because in 2016, it will be too late.”

To that end, the PAC has released its first ad — and even by the depressingly low standards of those afflicted with Clinton Derangement Syndrome, it’s pretty far out there.

The ad, apparently set at Hillary Clinton’s post-apocalyptic inauguration, reintroduces a laundry list of debunked Clinton conspiracies in an effort to scare voters away from the former Secretary of State. From Vince Foster’s suicide to Whitewater to Benghazi, the Stop Hillary PAC has created a handy cheat sheet to every baseless attack that ever failed to prevent the Clintons from enjoying more popular support than arguably any other politicians in America.

Stop Hillary PAC is just one of several outside groups that has already mobilized in an attempt to derail a potential Clinton campaign before it begins (another, “Stop Hillary 2016,” is led by Mitt Romney’s former campaign manager, Matt Rhoades.) But if a stale, absurd accusation that Clinton assassinated Vince Foster is the best that the right can come up with — here in 2013 — then Clinton’s march to the White House would actually be easier than anyone could have anticipated.

H/t: Breaking News USA

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