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Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX) attempted to join in with the hordes of people around the world commemorating the life of the undeniably heroic Nelson Mandela.

His Facebook message was simple and typical:

Nelson Mandela will live in history as an inspiration for defenders of liberty around the globe. He stood firm for decades on the principle that until all South Africans enjoyed equal liberties he would not leave prison himself, declaring in his autobiography, ‘Freedom is indivisible; the chains on any one of my people were the chains on all of them, the chains on all of my people were the chains on me.’ Because of his epic fight against injustice, an entire nation is now free.

We mourn his loss and offer our condolences to his family and the people of South Africa.

And the response was about as terrible as you could expect, with a few non-Ted Cruz fans sneaking in to mock the herd:

Ted Cruz Mandela

Unsurprisingly, Cruz’s page was far from the only right-wing site where the commenters weren’t big Mandela fans.

For a more nuanced conservative view on Mandela, read Max Boot in Commentary.

If you want to hear the great man explain his actions and political philosophy in his own words, this speech is worth your time.

MSNBC’s Chris Hayes points out that while liberals are mocking conservatives for their harsh views of Mandela, they’re sanitizing the legacy of the former president of South Africa who, for instance, compared Israel’s government to apartheid.

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