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By Christy Hoppe, The Dallas Morning News (MCT)

This week alone, Texas Gov. Rick Perry spent two days in New Hampshire, the first presidential primary state, and two days in South Carolina, the second primary state.

And his frequent references to a future presidential campaign means new hints shouldn’t come as a surprise. But he did inch even closer to an announcement on Tuesday.

At a lunch sponsored by the Myrtle Beach Area Chamber of Commerce, he told the crowd that, “I’ve got about 60 more days of being the governor of the state of Texas and then I’m going to do something different.”

He concluded with, “You’ll see me again,” according to the Myrtle Beach Sun News.

Over the past year, Perry has said he’s been getting prepared for his next step, especially after his disastrous first run for the Republican presidential nomination.

Perry has been in frequent discussions with foreign and domestic policy wonks from the George W. Bush administration and from Mitt Romney’s campaign.

He’s talked about America being a country of second chances and he’s visited Iowa, the first caucus state in the nation, more than any other potential contender in the past year.

In January 2012, after finishing fifth in Iowa and New Hampshire, Perry chose to drop out of the race a few days before the South Carolina primary.

He appears ready to erase that memory.

Photo: Gage Skidmore via Flickr

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