By Jason Sattler

5 Examples Of The GOP’s ‘Dark Vein Of Intolerance’

January 15, 2013 6:12 pm Category: Memo Pad, Politics 67 Comments A+ / A-

Colin Powell is a still a Republican. The man who served President Reagan and both Bushes refuses to leave the party that once prayed for him to run for its presidential nomination.

But he also refuses to to remain silent while he sees the Party of Lincoln run rampant with hostility toward everyone but straight white males.

“There’s also a dark vein of intolerance in some parts of the party,” Powell said on NBC’s Meet the Press. When asked to explain, he said, “What I mean by that is they still sort of look down on minorities.”

Powell cited specific examples of Republican policies designed to prevent African-Americans from voting, the birthers, and Sarah Palin and John Sununu’s racially provocative language.

Demetrius Minor posted a rebuttal to Powell on the FreedomWorks blog that acknowledged that “the GOP must re-evaluate its approach and methods of messaging to minority communities.” But Minor then went on to use Powell’s appointment by Bush and the existence of one Democrat who questioned President Obama’s birth certificate as proof that Powell was being unfair. He even defended Palin’s use of “shuck and jive,” accusing the four-star general of “uber sensitivity.”

After saying that Powell’s voting for Obama twice basically invalidates the former Secretary of State’s position, Minor suggests Powell “actively involve himself in transforming the GOP.”

But the problem with the GOP is that no top Republicans are willing to call out the GOP’s intolerance. Powell is trying to help the GOP see what most everyone but diehard right-wingers see. And when it gets pointed out that the Republican Party is losing support from every group but married white males, often Republicans insult the groups they’ve alienated even more by suggesting they only vote Democrat because they’ve been promised “gifts.”

In case Republicans need more explanation, here are five clear examples of the intolerance teeming through parts of America’s right wing.

Photo credit: jdlasica via Flickr.com

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5 Examples Of The GOP’s ‘Dark Vein Of Intolerance’ Reviewed by on . Colin Powell is a still a Republican. The man who served President Reagan and both Bushes refuses to leave the party that once prayed for him to run for its pre Colin Powell is a still a Republican. The man who served President Reagan and both Bushes refuses to leave the party that once prayed for him to run for its pre Rating:

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  • bpai99

    Never underestimate the power of hate and unreasoning fanaticism in human affairs. These people are truly dangerous and a threat to our nation.

    • montanabill

      Read your own post.

  • montanabill

    Here are five more examples of a ‘Dark Vein of Intolerance':
    1. Colin Powell, Secretary of State, Chairman of Joint Chiefs, National Security Advisor, all under Republican Presidents.
    2. Condoleezza Rice
    3. Herman Cain
    4. Michael Steele
    5. Alan West

    Those are just a few of the great many accomplished people applauded and respected by Republicans and Conservatives. I would love to have listed hundreds more and simply picking five was a grab bag.

    Keep playing your crappy race card, hypocrites.

    • awakenaustin

      Wow! Five examples and you can count them on one hand. I would love you to list hundreds more. Sort of reminds you of the old “I’m not prejudiced, some of my best friends are African-American.”
      The Republicans get an appointed African American Senator and the party touts it as some major accomplishment. If the integration of African Americans into the GOP is so obvious and so common, why does your party make such a big deal of it. There have been 106 African American members of the House of Representatives since 1929. Five of those were Republicans. Today there are no African American members of the House who are Republicans. I am sure it is all some conspiracy or a misperception. It could not possibly be because African Americans as a group see the Republican party as intolerant of them and their concerns and issues.
      You might consider actually substantively changing your party regarding the inclusion of African Americans rather than complaining about how unfair it is for others to point out your failure on that front.

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Yvette-White/100000416568269 Yvette White

        very well said. Awakenaustin

      • montanabill

        Did you pay attention to the title of the article?
        Do you know why there are no black members of the House? There were certainly a number of very good people running. Guess who voted against them.
        By the way, they are not ‘African Americans’. They are Americans. You need to help change your party’s using the race card when you don’t have a valid argument.
        BTW, within party get togethers, meetings or just group discussions, the race of a person is never a topic of conversation. That subject is always, I mean always, brought up by the left.

        • awakenaustin

          Just keep living in that echo chamber. There is a reason African Americans voted for the Democrats. There is a reason why at all levels of economic, social and cultural success and achievement African Americans voted overwhelmingly for Democrats. You can continue to pretend the reason is something other than their accurate perception that the GOP is inhospitable to them and dismissive of their concerns and issues. In fact, please continue to do so. It will insure that they continue to overwhelmingly support the Democratic Party.
          Gee, here is a novel thought. Maybe they didn’t get elected because they were Republicans? Maybe the people voting in those districts did not like the GOP’s positions on political issues?
          The “race” card. Every time someone raises a legitimate concern about racial bias, the classic Republican response is not to examine the substance of the issue, but to accuse someone of playing the “race” card. The effort of course is to create some pejorative connotation and association in order to undermine the speaker and thereby avoiding having to deal with the substance of the concern. Sort of like labeling people as not American citizens and socialists and Muslims and un-American rather than addressing the believed shortcomings of their positions.
          Re: never bringing race up in conversation – apparently the Republicans here in Texas didn’t get the memo.

          • montanabill

            I heard the reason from the ladies behind me in the voting line. They were going to get a free house, free food and an Obama phone. I kid you not!

          • awakenaustin

            Really? The only people promising anyone gifts were Republicans asserting that as the reason people were voting for the President. I challenge you to provide a single legitimate, documented example of any Democratic candidate or party organization offering or even suggesting people would get any kind of gift or any other similar such consideration. This is solely and completely a Republican Party generated campaign slander. The only people who ever believed this nonsense voted for the Republican candidates. You lost the election. You lost it because more people did not like your message, policies or candidate than liked them. You did not lose it because people thought they would get gifts.
            However, please be my guest in continuing to believe and repeat this nonsense. It will just mean we are sure to win the next one also.

          • montanabill

            I hate to bust your bubble, but what I said was absolutely true. There were three of them going on about it, and all my wife and I could do was look at each other. If you think there weren’t a lot of really low information voters transported to the polling station, you have a lot to learn.

          • awakenaustin

            A single solitary documented example of any Democratic Candidate or party document or speech or documented news report of any Democrat promise of gifts for voting?
            Any suggestion from anyone who wasn’t a Republican or Republican shill (also known as a conservative news source or pundit)? Just one documented single solitary one?

          • montanabill

            I am not talking about the real world, I’m talking about the world as perceived by certain voters. Somehow, these ladies (and I suspect many like them) believed what they were saying. Now you can claim I really didn’t hear what we heard, but that won’t change reality.

          • awakenaustin

            My curiosity is in the area of where anyone with that idea might have gotten it. My dispute is with the implication pushed by shills of the GOP that people voted for President Obama promised them “gifts.” Rather than accept that folks might just like him better or prefer his policies or prefer his message and then work substantively to address those concerns instead they come up some silly and completely bogus idea that the problem doesn’t lie with the GOP but in the irrational behavior of the Democratic electorate. If the idea is to move in the area irrational voting behavior, then the GOP ought to consider the rational nature of those who voted against the President because they believed he wasn’t born here, that he was ideologically a socialist or a fascist or a communist (chose one), that he was a Muslim, that he was plotting to have the United Nations take over the US or all the other crazy nonsense offered by the Republican fringe as reason not to vote for him. Nonsense, I should add, for which there is not even a scintilla of supporting evidence.

          • montanabill

            To put a little light on your claim of nonsense for those who think that Obama is a socialist/communist, try reading his own book, ‘Dreams from My Father’. Then take a look at the politics of his minister, Jeremiah Wright and his friend (not just some guy down the street), Bill Ayers, and those he appointed to high positions, like Van Jones. A lot of smoke for no fire.

            I can’t tell you how a lot of people got the ideas they did, but I can tell that the sentiments of the ladies I overheard saying they were going to get free housing, free food and iPhones were not uncommon in their community.
            To the contrary.

            FYI, I live in a mixed neighborhood, very close to a not-so-mixed section of town. Let’s just say that there are a substantial number of very low information voters in the area.

          • awakenaustin

            As I said not a scintilla of evidence. By this logic, everyone who knows and associates with Glenn Beck, Michelle Malkin and Michelle Bachmann is a moron. The evidence of Van Jones being a communist is non-existence. A rumor and an accusation are not evidence. Per the views of Republicans anyone who advocates for social justice and for civil rights (excepting guns) is a socialist, so it is worthless as a defining concept of anything. Jeremiah Wright maybe a flaming idiot, but a communist? Bill Ayers – Mr. Weather Underground. Ronald Reagan is clearly a communist and socialist by this view. He knew all those Hollywood writers, actors and actresses who were members of the CPUSA in the 30’s and 40’s. You can’t believe him just cause he said he wasn’t. He acted with them. He went to parties with them. He was friends with some of them. Pretty clearly he was a communist. Where there is smoke there is fire.
            Individuals can accurately be identified socialists or communists based on the beliefs they profess, the actions they undertake and the organizations they join and support. Socialism and communism are reasonably well organized systems of belief with an actual specific meanings. People are not communists because someone says they are, especially when none of their professed beliefs, actions and organizational memberships are socialist or communist. Socialists are not communists are not fascists. These are all separately identifiable sets of beliefs. Those who accuse the President of being a socialist or a communist display for all the world to see, their profound ignorance of what it means to be a socialist or a communist. They profess for the world the breadth of their gullibility and willingness to believe something without any evidence of its truth.

          • montanabill

            I don’t really need evidence when I have the experience of seeing what I see and hearing what I hear. You can choose to believe it or not, it won’t make a difference in reality.

            It is the political beliefs of those you associate with that identify your outlook and thinking. I believe I know the differences between political systems since of them have occurred and dissipated while I’ve been alive. Whenever government becomes too omnipotent, the system will eventually fail.

            You seem to be living in the land of rationalization and denial

          • awakenaustin

            Clearly, then, there is a difference. I live in a fact and reality based world which requires evidence of something to accept that it is true. It is absolutely true that reality exists whether one believes it or not. Things are not true simply because I believe them to be true. Things are true whether of not I believe them to be true. You have admitted that you don’t need evidence beyond what you see and hear personally.
            So you agree with me then that Ronald Reagan was a communist, because he associated with communists. (There is a lot more evidence of his association with communists than President Obama’s.)
            Experientially the sun rises in the east. Actually, the sun does not move relative to us. Rather we spin on an axis, which creates the illusion of the sun rising. The moon appears larger when it is low in the horizon than it appears over head. However, we know that it does not actually change its size depending on where it is in our sky. It is the truth, i.e., a reality, that our perceived experience of things is incorrect or inaccurate. Maybe a cautious person would look for evidence of the truth of things beyond his or her own personal experiences, before he accepted his personal experience as evidence of some universal truth.

          • montanabill

            Sure, Ronald Reagan was a communist and you are a clear thinking individual.

          • awakenaustin

            You simply don’t understand do you? I don’t think Reagan is a communist. He isn’t. There is no evidence that he is. In much the same way there is no evidence that President Obama is a socialist or a communist. Let me be very clear. If you are anyone else thinks he is, then you should offer some evidence other than the silly kind of association evidence I offered about President Reagan. Either that or just flash us your Moron ID card and we will understand.

          • seethroughurlies

            If Obama is a socialist or a communist, he is not very good at it. Corporate profits are at an all time high, The stock market hit a record highs in 5 years a couple of days ago.

          • montanabill

            Actually, he is pretty good at it. There are 83 welfare programs that have a combined bigger budget than the military, including the wars, Social Security or Medicare. The effects of Obamacare are just now beginning to kick in. The only way to make healthcare worse would have been to nationalize it. He has created enormous dependency on the government and fully intends to expand dependency. His goal is to try to create even outcomes regardless of the individual effort expended.

            Some corporations are making record profits. Some always do. Others, especially small business, not so much. The stock market is a reflection of gambling fever, not of how well any particular business is doing. It is driven more by emotion than real business information.

          • seethroughurlies

            you need to look up who the originator of the “Obama Phone ” was. Hint, it wasn’t Obama. And if you think the Republicans never offered free housing check out how Reagan administration hooked all then Vietnamese boat people with free housing, no income tax for five years, money for college, etc. This welfare thing has been going on for as long as I can remember, and I’m 58 years old. I haven’t noticed any difference in the amount with Obama in office.

          • montanabill

            Beg your pardon? The welfare budget is larger than the military’s, Social Security or Medicare. Food stamp users have increased from 28.2 million to 45 million. Unemployment compensation keeps getting extended. And you haven’t noticed?

            I don’t know anything about the ‘Obama phone’, except what I heard from voters behind me in line. I have no idea where they got the ‘free house’ or ‘free food’ ideas, either. But I do know, their beliefs were not uncommon.

    • ococoob

      Alan West?????!! Please!

      • montanabill

        I can only assume you bought, hook, line and sinker, the vicious stories used against him in the campaign, paid for by a huge wad of mysterious money, part of which came from Obama’s Fieldworks Team.
        Would you rather I’d have mentioned Mia Love, Erika Harold, J.C. Watts, Alan Keyes or someone from the past like Zora Hurston or Martin Luther King? How about Rush Limbaugh’s producer, James Golden?

        • metrognome3830

          Bill, I do have to admire your loyalty, but it is getting in the way of the truth. The first man you name, Colin Powell, is the one who is talking about the intolerance of the Republican party. Of course it’s not talked about openly at Republican gatherings. They don’t have to talk about it. It’s tacitly understood by those who are intolerant. You mention a list of five. The likes of Alan West or Michael Steele (they moved him down pretty quickly when he stepped over the party line). Alan West who has a list of 80 Communists in congress. But I guess he is too polite to say who they are publicly. Of course the party loves these people. They toe the line (although Powell seems to be getting tired of it.) Rush Limbaugh’s producer? Now’s there is a real claim to fame. I’m surprised he would want anyone to know what he does for a living. The fact is, Bill, that there are many fine, intelligent, hard-working black people. But most of them are not Republicans.

          • montanabill

            I listed Colin first, because it was the ‘intolerance’ of the Republican Party that allowed him to attain his political positions. Now you can throw stones at blacks who are conservatives, but remember it is a glass house. It is easy enough to pick a fair number of members of the Congressional Black Caucus and find outrageous statements or actions, or even investigation for suspected wrong doing.

            Turns out that I, too, know a number of fine, intelligent, hard-working black people. I hire some and socialize with some. They are Republicans. I also can say the same about every other race group.

          • metrognome3830

            I think Powell’s initial claim to fame came from lying for George W. Bush to the United Nations. I don’t know what I think about his decision to remain a Republican after the way they used him. I can only assume that there are still enough honorable members of the party to make him feel it is worth his while to stay with it. I think Mr. Powell is, basically, a decent and honorable person. Some of the others on your list . . . not so much.

          • montanabill

            The unanswered question is whether Colin knew the information was concocted or if anyone in the chain knew. Even today, we get photographs of some object and scientists take a guess at what they are looking at, whether it is surveillance photos or space photos. Since WMD’s were never found, the skeptics quickly assume that someone fabricated false information. But it may be that even the best analysts were fooled by what they were looking at. Sometimes, you see what you expect to see.

            I don’t think it would be fair to guess what Colin’s motivations are. He’s a mature man, fully capable of expressing himself. Why endorse Barack Obama, the antithesis of a Republican especially given what we know about his background, only Colin can answer that question.

          • metrognome3830

            It is an unanswered question, Bill, and my opinion is that Powell was lied to just like the rest of us. I think it is pretty well understood by now that there were no WMDs. And I think there is some pretty strong evidence that Bush, Cheney et al. knew it before they sent troops into war. As to any endorsement of Obama, I’m only guessing what you are hinting at in re: his background. My endorsement is not all that enthusiastic. It is more that I didn’t care at all for his opponent. I might have even, maybe, have considered John McCain until he caved in and veered from center-right to extreme right and picked Sarah Palin for a running mate. I’m not sure why he did that. But he has done nothing since that would make me regret not voting for him. I think Powell is making it pretty clear that he feels the same way about the extreme right turn of the Republican party.

          • montanabill

            Well, unless one of them does a death bed confession, all we’ll have is our guesses.
            Let me ask a question. Exactly what stance that the ‘extreme’ right wants, do you disagree the most with?

          • metrognome3830

            Well . . . right now, I guess it would have to be their insistence that after nearly at least 3 decades of deficit spending, they now think they can dictate that it be fixed in months. And if not, they are willing to take us into default on our debts. These debts did not come about in the last four years and to fix it is going to require a lot more planning and bi-partisan cooperation than the ‘extremes’ and all the others want to invest in it. They are mainly a bunch of kids playing grown-up. I have been around long enough to be the age of their fathers or even grandfathers, and I believe you have been on the planet for some time as well. You know that these kids are not going to solve our problems by throwing tantrums and insisting on having their way. First, we need to do what we can now to cut wasteful programs, then we need to take a look at revising our convoluted tax code. It could be made very simple and it would probably bring in more revenue than it does now. Anything done in haste usually turns out badly. I say that from personal experience. We’ve survived this long, I think we still have a little time left to work out sensible solutions.

          • montanabill

            I don’t hear them saying they want an instantaneous fix. What they are asking for is simply some cuts to stem some of our deficit spending. So far, they have been met with ‘spending is not a problem’ or Obama’s claim that he’s already saved $4T. An absolutely ludicrous claim.

            I certainly agree on cutting wasteful programs. The problem is every program has its proponents and lobbyists. A guy named Connie Mack ran for the Senate and offered what I thought was a pretty sensible plan. There is not a single program in Washington that does not have waste and an inflated budget. Mack’s plan was to simply freeze their current funding and cut 1% from it. No automatic increases but funding that is actually 1% less next year. It is pretty easy to handle a 1% decrease in funding. Do that same process for at least five years. That way, everyone’s ox gets gored equally. I don’t remember whether it was 5 years or 7 years, but somewhere in there we would be back to a balanced budget. The biggest problems are still Social Security, Medicare and Obamacare. At some point, Democrats are going to have face up to some changes. As long as they offer no solutions of their own and demonize every Republican proposal, it insures future generations will pay the price.

            The tax code has more pages than the bible. A simple flat tax or 3 step progressive tax with no deductions, starting for those making enough not to be classified as poverty level. I think that would allow us to cut the IRS more than 1%.

          • metrognome3830

            I absolutely agree with you on the tax code change, Bill. Your idea is the same as mine. It would be simple, it would eliminate loopholes, it would raise more revenue and everyone would pay something unless they fell to the poverty level. I think that would allow us to cut way more than 1% from the IRS. It takes a lot of personnel to administer the bloated system we have now. And, even with all the people we have in the IRS, I would question whether even one of them fully understood the tax code we have now.

            As to other programs to be cut, I would guess that something could most likely be cut from just about every program. However, it’s not fair to just go after SS, Medicare and the ACA (sorry, I refuse to call it Obamacare since it includes sections that came from others, including Republicans as well as Democrats). Something needed to be done about health care in this country. Here we have some of the best medical personnel, the best medical equipment and research, but we rank well below the top in medical care because a large segment of our population can’t afford it. SS is a big cost item now because the government was allowed to use money in the trust fund in the general fund and leave IOUs in the trust fund. How could they not know that the Boomer generation was going to start hitting retirement age right about now and start paying back those IOUs years ago? That is money we and our employers paid in and it was supposed to be in an interest-bearing account (to refute those who argue that we get back more than we paid in) to supplement our retirement after (in my case) 49 years of working and paying into SS. Now especially, seeing the demise of industrial pensions, people depend quite heavily on SS to allow them to retire at 66, eventually at 67 (65 is now in the past). Not everyone is physically able to work until 70 or 75. For some, they will never see retirement. Even at 65, some people just didn’t make it. So we made the adjustment to raise full retirement age to 67 in increments. But any suggestion to raise the cap a few thousand dollars meets with instant resistance. So, while some Republicans want to go after Social Security, they offer no viable plan to replace it. Bush’s plan to privatize it thankfully went nowhere. What would the situation be now if he had succeeded? Do you have a 401K? What happened to it during the recession. My brokerage actually bragged about the fact that they lost only 37% of my money. Unfortunately, they were losing my money right about the time I wanted to retire. If I didn’t have SS and a couple of other small pensions, I would still be working — at 74. The solution isn’t to cut Social Security. The solution is to quit stealing the money from the fund. There should be funds in there now to fund the program fully for more than 20 years. It’s not there, so now they just want to cut it, or more preferably, they would just like to dump it. Yes, future generations will have to pay the price. But it won’t be because of today’s retirees. They already paid. It will be because of excessive spending on other things. Cut that spending first. This congress is trying to lay all the blame on Democrats and Obama specifically. That’s just whistling through the graveyard, hoping nobody will notice that this deficit spending has been going on for decades. Take a look at what happened to the deficit under Reagan. Dick Cheney proclaimed that the deficit “was just numbers.” It didn’t mean anything to him. Debt Ceilings? They have routinely and often been raised by every president from Eisenhower forward. We all sat silently through that and now the young turks (we have the youngest and most inexperienced congress we have ever had) And they are not thinking things through before they charge ahead. To paraphrase another old saying, “Legislate in haste and repent in leisure.”

            Sorry to go on so long, Bill, I get wound up and don’t always know when to stop. I’m glad we had this discussion. It’s always good to communicate with someone who doesn’t resort to name-calling and disrespect, even if we don’t agree on everything. You have a nice day and it was good to hear from you.

        • http://profile.yahoo.com/WSJDG76E3GMBG34ZDTF2RBCNCA Marlo The Bear

          Jackie Robinson was a Republican, but that didn’t make him a saint. There have always been blacks who have spoke out against the masses to gain favortism from the white establishment. There is not enough paper to write down all of the names of the great blacks that were not Republicans. You obviously must think black people are stupid. You don’t bite the hand that feeds you.

        • ALTreality

          I didn’t have to hear his obnoxious hate speech through the media, since he was the congressman from my district, the 22nd. He voted against a bill to help the handicapped – how low can you go? I had the dubious honor of hearing his delusional garbage and racist BS live and in person. He ran for re-election in another district, thank God, so he isn’t our local problem anymore.

          The people of the 18th district voted West out of office and elected a guy that was nearly unknown. Even though Murphy was outspent over 4-to-1 during his race, he won because of a ridiculously simple campaign slogan: “I am NOT Allen West”. Time will tell what kind of congressman Patrick Murphy will turn out to be, but West was both a local and a national embarrassment. He didn’t need anyone to sully his reputation in the media, he thrived on making offensive and controversial statements, which were his only stock in trade. Good riddance.

          Your defense of such a despicable example of political refuse speaks volumes about your character.

          • montanabill

            It is my observation here, that anything said contrary to liberal thinking, is ‘hate speech’. I have yet to hear Mr. West on any TV program use anything close to hate speech. Simply saying he voted against a bill to help the handicap doesn’t tell me anything. Which bill was it and what else did the bill have in it? Did it duplicate an already existing assistance bill?

            I will assume that your ‘character’ didn’t think the cartoon ad showing West punching women and seniors was offensive or controversial.

          • ALTreality

            My opinion of Allen West does not come from the media, since I don’t watch television at all. My distaste comes from personal observation at local events going back to when he first lost to Ron Klein back in 2008. His arrogance and contempt for anyone that does not agree with him comes across with abusive speech and ridicule, much of which sadly has NOT been reported in the news. This is not a trait to be admired in ANY public official, and the minimum I require of them is to conduct themselves with civility and dignity. I greatly admire the way Colin Powell conducts himself, even when I disagree with him, because he does not come across like Allen West, who only engages in a race to the bottom. The fact that an underfunded nobody ran against West and defeated him simply by saying ‘I’m not him’ says quite a bit about his local reputation. I couldn’t tell you much about what Patrick Murphy’s positions are on any issue, because the only thing he ran on is the intense dislike and disgust people around here had for West. A local group, who will remain anonymous thanks to Citizens United, ran that offensive cartoon ad against West.

            Call me ‘old school’ but I was raised to to be polite and not descend into racist rants and lowlife behavior, simply because I don’t agree with someone. I find it just as offensive when people called Romney and Bush vile names as I do those idiots that descend to kindergarten-level name-calling by twisting Obama’s name on these blogs. I have many objections to Obama myself, based on his policies, but I don’t need to make the attacks personal in nature.

            I assumed since you voiced support for Allen West, you approve of his obnoxious behavior and lack of civility. I, for one, am beyond relieved that he in no longer embarrassing Florida on the national stage. Our governor, the biggest con man in politics whose claim to fame is heading the company that committed the largest Medicare fraud in history (company was fined $1.7 Billion), is embarrassment enough. There are groups here trying to pass a recall amendment to get him out of office.

          • montanabill

            You are certainly entitled to your opinion and if he was your Congressman, you probably know more about him than I do. However, to say that Murphy was an underfunded nobody is just not accurate. He came from a prominent family and had plenty of funding, though perhaps not as much as West.

            I’ve never seen West engaged in the behaviors you describe. The times I have seen him on TV, he has been a gentleman, extremely well spoken and pretty much spot-on with his comments.

            I know your governor because I’m in the health care industry and the fame of his company is well known.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Yvette-White/100000416568269 Yvette White

      the only crappy Hypocrites is the republicans who now are the KKK now you do not have to agree with me but i know what i here and see from that side and they all are a bunch of ass-holes just like you and all conservatives are.

      • montanabill

        Uh-huh. I’m sure you know a lot of Republicans so you have first hand information. Keep up the hate shield so you won’t ever have to discover you might be wrong.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Yvette-White/100000416568269 Yvette White

      you all do not have to worry about geting another vote from any black’s in this country aging and you all have your-self’s to blame for that.WATCH.

      • montanabill

        You are pretty grouchy today. Didn’t your food stamps arrive?

    • http://profile.yahoo.com/HGC4BGWVYXV76PHZBPSPOOU5GA Independent1

      Aside from Powell and Rice, let’s see you list three more that have an IQ above 50: Cain, Steele and West sure don’t.

      • montanabill

        I believe those are racist remarks.

        • http://profile.yahoo.com/WSJDG76E3GMBG34ZDTF2RBCNCA Marlo The Bear

          That’s your mentality.

    • hal621

      OK — MONTANA BILL….BIG GUY….U actually have the balls to include Herman Cain & Alan West in the same category as Powell, Rice & Steele, & I’m sure u would have “loved to have listed hundreds more”…………problem is…..just ain’t any mo!

      • montanabill

        Peter Boulware, Michelle Bernard, Keith Butler, Jennifer Carroll, Ron Christie, Mia Love, Clarence Thomas, James Meredith, Star Parker, Jack E. Robinson III, Shelby Steele, J. Dale Wainwright, Barb Davis Wright, Lynn Swan, Joe Rogers, Vernon Parker, Constance Berry Newman, Angela McGlowan, Alan Keyes, and J.C. Watts, in no particular order and a very partial list. But that’s enough for your ‘just ain’t any mo’.

        • hal621

          come back when you can really list”hundreds”

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_KOPKDFAUQPIIRAFI3HEXNMSHLQ Ed

      Well, 2 out of five ain’t bad. But Condeleza Rice? Herman Cain? Alan West? Yeah, I guess the party is tolerant when you pay homage or say stupid things. But of course it is still true that the Republican Party wil;l still staunchly defend the RIGHT of EVERY AMERICAN to sleep under bridges and beg for food.

      • montanabill

        I will defend that right as well. Maybe the mentally ill who have no place to go deserve better, but any healthy person is doing it by their own choice.

        By the way, just for a little perspective, what is your opinion of Corrine Brown, Maxine Waters, Jesse Jackson Jr., Jim Clyburn or Alcee Hastings?

  • amazonfan

    Great piece, although I would argue that you forgot one form of intolerance that the Repubs have mastered: Islamophobia.

  • johninPCFL

    “But it’s a such a small fringe, why are there so many examples of blatant racism? And why are Republican leaders generally unwilling to condemn them?”

    Because all of the old Dixiecrats who jumped ship when Kennedy and Johnson backed the civil rights acts (close to 1/3 of the party, and most of the “base”) would jump ship again. Come to think of it, maybe they already have. Tea, anyone?

  • rr3A

    Reality for the GOP is called…..”living in a 1700’s bubble…”
    some Rep in the GOP once again….is comparing President Obama to Sadam Hussein…before it was Hitler…..is difficult when hate does not allow you to see beyond your bloody nose…(bloody ’cause of the beating the radicals took in the Presidential election)….they simply don’t care….everything is in their ?????? minds….

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/IADWZHLK4QBEXX7E7NCXEPIX5M bluepegasus

    He is trying to help the GOP but they refuse to see anything but their narrow view, Yes, he was appointed by two Bushes but how long ago was that and how much has the GOP changed since then? They keep moving to the right and alienating voters, they will become even more insignificant.

  • http://www.facebook.com/keilbracht Kurt Paul Eilbracht

    The Good people which there are in the Republican party must come together and offer how constructive conservatism works. Lower taxes on every one. No special tax breaks for any body. A fair flat tax. Include all Americans in the party platform. No more finding ways to deny people to vote. If the Republican party is to survive they must find people not only of Lincoln, but of Teddy Rooselvelt, Everet Dirksen, and yes Ronald Regaan the tea baggers would gently push him aside. As a Republican the party needs to recruit hispanic,Sfrp Americans, and Asian business people and get their input and come up with a plan yelling anti liberal obcenties in itself is not going to get the job done. Show how a good conservative program will create jobs. Get off the Pro Gun Pro life high horse. Liberals are laughing at us.

    • http://profile.yahoo.com/2RSU2EFO5MPALIURETNSGUUSCE James

      Finally a republican who makes sense.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jim-Myers/100001512942781 Jim Myers

    I find it ironic that the party that tried, unsuccessfully, to change the law so Arnold Schwarzenegger could run for President, is STILL trying to claim that President Obama is not a Natural Born Citizen.

    HYPOCRISY IS ALIVE AND WELL IN THE “GOP”.

    • http://profile.yahoo.com/GCXB2EABXANRR2IK7QHS3TAPOU ROBERT C HASTINGS

      Great point! I am sill amazed that someone didn’t question the legitimacy of Mitt Romney’s claims to citizenship, after all, his parents were from Mexico.

  • http://profiles.yahoo.com/u/CC7LJBFDYRZXVVOZI7Y4L3VA5I Steve

    When George W won, the electronic voting machines were used ( no paper trail) , exit polls and the tally were opposite. where there was a paper trail the exit polls matched within 1-2 %

  • jstsyn

    They (republicans) are rather sickening, aren’t they?

  • onedonewong

    Here’s a well know racist trying to smear the GOP with his own brush.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/ZEDCQ4URHFFCKH5THB4DT3G54M Brian

    National Socialism is alive and well and living in the RepubliCon party.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_AZUK56N4OJGWHRKJSJSDGFTOXI Butch

    The ‘bread and butter’ of the republicKKKan party are racists and bigots. Stupid lack luster frauds of low intelligence and spotty credit records not worthy of the street scum on my boots.

  • ALTreality

    I should clarify my statement by saying that while Patrick Murphy was from a prominent family and he was a successful businessman, he was a POLITICAL nobody; he never held any kind of public office previously. And Murphy was outspent by West over 4-1, which under normal circumstances makes him appear severely underfunded.

    One of the reasons that I do NOT watch television is that it rarely presents the truth, only the agendas of either extreme. I think that if you had witnessed first-hand some of West’s behavior around his biker-gang ‘posse’ and some of his followers, you’d know exactly what I was talking about. In my younger days, I tended bar in a biker bar patronized by the Outlaws and the Pagans, and they had a lot more couth than Allen West.

  • Mulligatonney

    The words of the people on just the first few posts on this site “Hate and intolerance… Dangerous…A threat to our nation…Racism…Dixiecrats…

    Very astute assessment of Republicans and Tea Party members. Those “wascally wabbits”… an excerpt from the Chronicles of the illustrious Elmer Fudd when stalking the diabolical Bugs Bunny…

    Do you people know how many of the mass shooters over the last 20 years were Republicans and Tea Party members?

    Do you know how many of them were registered Democrats?

    You said it very well – never underestimate the power of hate and unreasoning fanaticism…

    From the comic strip Pogo – “We have met the enemy, and he is us…”
    From the Bible – “Professing to be wise, they became fools…”

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/PMVMZMDLRQL3TRK5RNOHJVZPHU stoptheinsanity

    The Republican party, for so many decades, has been the party of racism and intolerance. After the passage of civil rights legislation under President Johnson, Dixiecrats and other racists fled in droves to the Republican party. They have been there ever since. Republicans are still living in their “insulated” world of “white men only are welcomed.” They have made every effort possible to disenfranchise minority voters from voting through their redistricting, voter suppression laws in minority and Democratic districts, and drastically cutting the number of voting days and voting machines in these heavily Democratic precincts. Despite their significant losses in the November 2012 election, Republicans still don’t see a need to change any of their policies. Instead, they talk about simply repackaging their message. They still “don’t get it” or choose to just ignore it. Republicans think that by just using rhetoric and using a Black or Latina politician as a token of their “supposed” change, that they will be able to fool Americans into believing that they really have changed. The majority of Americans aren’t stupid and will see right through all their trickery and chicanery. The reality of America is that demographics have changed significantly. It is no longer the “good ole white boy strategy” that will win national elections. Unless a party genuinely appeals to Latinas, Blacks, Asians, unmarried white women, and young people through policy and not simply rhetoric, that party will continue to diminish and eventually become irrelevant in national politics.

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