The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

By Charles Rabin, The Miami Herald

MIAMI — Two gunmen sprayed a Miami apartment complex with dozens of rounds of gunfire from automatic weapons early Tuesday morning, killing two people and seriously injuring seven others, in one of the worst mass shootings in Miami in decades.

Kevin Richardson, 30, was killed, his family said. The other victim, according to media reports, was Nakiel Jackson, 26. A 17-year-old girl is in critical condition at Jackson Memorial Hospital, and the names of the other victims at the same hospital were still unknown late into the morning.

Though details remained sketchy, police believe two men pulled up to an apartment complex in the Liberty City neighborhood, got out of a dark SUV with two high-powered weapons, fired into a crowd of dozens milling about outside, then fled.

The gunmen have not been found. The gunfire came from an AK-47 and an AR-15 assault rifle. Police also believe the intended target wasn’t at the scene.

“The motive at this point is still unknown. We’re still investigating,” said Miami police spokeswoman Frederica Burden.

The somber but chaotic scene outside the two-story apartment complex where the shooting occurred was made even more grim as Richardson’s body remained on the ground covered by a tarp and partially obscured from friends and family members by a barricade.

The medical examiner didn’t retrieve the body until well after 9 a.m. More than five dozen shell casings from the gunfire littered the sidewalk, parking lot, and street.

Richardson’ mother cried out as her son’s body was removed.

“He said he was coming back. I want my baby. He don’t mean no harm to nobody,” Hermonya Richardson shouted.

Police were having a tough time gathering information as many in the neighborhood, fearing retribution, refused to help. Police didn’t know why so many people were outside so late in the evening.

Bennae Robinson, a family friend of Richardson’s, spoke briefly.

“If you know anything, come forward and say something, because it could be your child,” she said.

Photo: Miami Herald/MCT/Walter Michot

Interested in national news? Sign up for our daily newsletter.

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Attorney General Merrick Garland

The coming weeks will be the most consequential of Merrick Garland's life — not just for the attorney general himself but for our country. Garland will have to decide, presumably with the support of President Joe Biden, how to address the looming authoritarian threat of former President Donald J. Trump and his insurrectionary gang. His first fateful choice will be how to deal with Stephen K. Bannon, the fascism-friendly, criminally pardoned former Trump senior adviser who has defied a subpoena from the House Select Committee investigating the events of Jan. 6.

That panel has issued a contempt citation of Bannon, which will reach the floor for approval by the full House early next week. When that resolution passes, as it assuredly will, Speaker Nancy Pelosi will ask the U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia to open a prosecution of Bannon, which could ultimately cost him a year behind bars and a fine of $100,000. (Trump won't be able to deliver a pardon, as he did last January to save Bannon from prison for defrauding gullible Trumpists in a "build the wall" scheme.)

Keep reading... Show less

By Lisa Richwine and Bhargav Acharya

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - A union that represents about 60,000 behind-the-scenes workers in film and television reached a tentative deal with producers on Saturday, averting a strike that threatened to cause widespread disruption in Hollywood, negotiators said.

Keep reading... Show less
x
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}