The National  Memo Logo

Smart. Sharp. Funny. Fearless.

Monday, December 09, 2019

A Love With Food Subscription Will Change Your Snacking Game — For As Low As $7.99

Between Doritos and Funyuns and Pop Tarts and the like, it’s easy for snacking to get out of hand pretty darn quick. I mean, there’s no argument — those super salty and shockingly sweet treats often taste great. But if you’re not careful, it won’t be long before there’s a whole lot more of you there to feed.

So, if you love to snack (and who doesn’t?), you can nosh responsibly and still enjoy your treats with a subscription to Love With Food ($7.99 for a one-month subscription from The National Memo Store).

Every month, you’ll get a knock at the door to find a box filled with 15 or more new and surprise snacks. And this isn’t your typical convenience store chip or supermarket aisle cookie here. These selections are organic, all-natural or gluten-free, each curated to taste great without all the junk.

No trans fats. No hydrogenated oils, artificial colors or flavoring. No high fructose corn syrup. Just snacks you’ll actually like that are good for you.

For the socially conscious among us (again, that should be everybody), Love With Food donates a portion of your subscription to fighting childhood hunger in the U.S. through organizations like Feeding America and the Global Food Banking Network.

Start feeling proud about your snacking with a Love With Food subscription — either a one-month plan ($7.99), a three-month plan ($22.99) or a one-month box for your entire office featuring over 65 great snack options ($56.99).

This sponsored post is brought to you by StackCommerce.  

Advertising

Start your day with National Memo Newsletter

Know first.

The opinions that matter. Delivered to your inbox every morning

Leopard 2 tanks

This is the latest report in my months-long coverage of the war in Ukraine. For more reporting like this, and to read my screeds about the reprehensible Republican Party, please consider becoming a paid subscriber.

Keep reading...Show less
Youtube Screenshot

With Republicans once again setting the stage for gridlock in Congress over raising the U.S. Treasury's statutory debt limit, and using interviews to push disingenuous analogies comparing the federal government’s budgeting practices to that of an average American household. The real danger is that mainstream media could fall for this misleading comparison and pressure Democrats into enacting painful cuts to popular social programs, while also letting Republicans off the hook for their role in manufacturing this crisis in the first place.

These comparisons between federal and household budgets go back many years, and they ignore some glaring differences: Unlike a household or business, the U.S. government issues its own currency and can roll over its own debt. The political utility of this comparison, however, is that it has enabled conservatives to target social programs, while they avoid answering for their own role in running up the public debt through unfunded tax cuts under Republican administrations.

Keep reading...Show less
{{ post.roar_specific_data.api_data.analytics }}