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Monday, December 09, 2019 {{ new Date().getDay() }}

Donald Trump announced on Wednesday that he will keep his White House coronavirus task force going "indefinitely," despite saying a day earlier that he would soon wind it down because "we can't keep our country closed for the next five years."

Trump explained at a press spray that he had intended to shut it down — even as an internal White House projection showed the death toll from the pandemic increasing to 3,000 people per day by June 1 — but changed his mind because he discovered the task force is popular. A day earlier, Vice President Mike Pence, who heads the task force, said it was no longer needed due to the "tremendous progress we've made as a country."


From Trump's Wednesday remarks:

DONALD TRUMP: I guess, if you think, we're always winding it down. But you know it's a question of what the end point is. But I think it is a change, a little bit. I thought we could wind it down sooner, but I had no idea how popular the task force is until actually yesterday.
When I started talking about winding it down, I'd get calls from very respected people saying 'I think it would be better to keep it going, it's done such a good job.'
It's a respected task force. It's — I knew it myself, I didn't know whether or not it was appreciated by the public — but it is appreciated by the public.



Polling shows most Americans disapprove of Trump's response to the COVID-19 pandemic by an average of 43.7 percent approval to 50.9 percent disapproval.

Published with permission of The American Independent Foundation.

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Jeff Danziger lives in New York City. He is represented by CWS Syndicate and the Washington Post Writers Group. He is the recipient of the Herblock Prize and the Thomas Nast (Landau) Prize. He served in the US Army in Vietnam and was awarded the Bronze Star and the Air Medal. He has published eleven books of cartoons, a novel and a memoir. Visit him at DanzigerCartoons.

Participants hold placards as they mark Martin Luther King Jr. Day in Washington D.C. on January 17, 2022

Washington (AFP) - Members of Martin Luther King Jr's family joined marchers Monday in Washington urging Congress to pass voting rights reform as the United States marked the holiday commemorating the slain civil rights leader.

King's son Martin Luther King III spoke at the march, warning that many states "have passed laws that make it harder to vote" more than half a century after the activism of his father.

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